Search: kony 2012

...scale of communication. However, the success of Kony 2012 rests, not just on the new tools of social media, but also on much more familiar and conventional forms of political activity. Though social media may have been the catalyst, it was not the only reagent in this reaction. A few considerations in the case of Kony: Experience Invisible Children rocketed to global fame in March 2012 with the release of the Kony film, but this was not the first film from this group… or the second – Kony 2012 was...

issue and begin discussions on the topic. The old model was to write the article and let it find a place in academia. But the numbers don’t lie. I receive many, many more views and downloads by sharing my ideas through Facebook and Twitter—a groundswell of interest and support that a purely academic audience can’t match. International law needs to embrace social media. Kony 2012 should only inspire and encourage us—international law got the attention of the world. Kony 2012 accomplished what we all wish our ideas could do. So,...

Does social activism effectively raise awareness and promote accountability? 4. What is the difference between activism and “slacktivism”? 5. How has Kony 2012 impacted the situation in Northern Uganda and the surrounding area? 6. How has Kony 2012 impacted our perception of child soldiers? 7. What does social media activism promise for the future of international law? Kony 2012 has generated a tremendous amount of discussion, with a wide range of viewpoints. What is often overlooked is how this viral sensation has impacted international law. So let the debate begin!...

...with the one superficial, emotive and short video everyone knows about as the outer layer of the onion. I’m not surprised that intellectuals are criticizing the Kony 2012 video. But I’m also not surprised that it went viral. Kony 2012 has achieved the desired result, which was to make Joseph Kony famous, or rather infamous. Whether Kony will be held accountable in an international court of law remains to be seen. In the end, that may be beside the point. The court of international public opinion has rendered its verdict....

court.” If Kony is arrested this year, and if we believe that this would not have happened in the absence of the video, it is likely that the key change will have been in elite interest, not mass interest. 2) Does “citizen engagement on social issues” (where we see it) necessarily equate to “citizen understanding”? Obviously not: what KONY2012 has taught us is that the quantity of that “awareness” around issues may not be matched by the quality of citizen’s “understanding” of the relevant international law or the issues. KONY2012...

to create a distinction between the unfortunate Ugandan child soldier and the fortunate American child who describes Joseph Kony as a ‘bad guy’. But it raises the question of how social media can assist in bringing those who commit war crimes and crimes against humanity to justice. There are two competing sides to this argument: that awareness raising on atrocities is a sufficient goal in and of itself, but, conversely, that it perpetuates a false message that knowledge of atrocities will somehow stop them; that making Joseph Kony ‘famous’ will...

[Mark A. Drumbl is the Class of 1975 Alumni Professor at Washington and Lee University and author of Reimagining Child Soldiers (OUP, 2012).] How does Kony2012 inform our understanding of child soldiers? How does it sculpt international efforts to prevent child soldiering? Kony2012 feeds into and reinforces pre-existing assumptions and narratives. I argue in my book Reimagining Child Soldiers that these assumptions and narratives, however well-intentioned, lead to policy initiatives that assuage collective sensibilities but ultimately fall short in terms of actual effectiveness. People had thought hard about the effects...

[Michael A. Newton is Professor of the Practice of Law, Vanderbilt University Law School] The Kony 2012 campaign had the laudable goal of increasing public awareness in order to aid the search for justice and accountability in the wake of LRA atrocities. In fact, the worldwide attention had the paradoxical effect of demonstrating the lamentable reality that the optimal pathway towards authentic justice for LRA victims in that setting is neither simple nor self-obvious. This is true for a number of reasons which I shall summarize. Firstly, the complexity of...

you dare to dream big. And so was born a new national pastime: catching warlords with the stars. According to YouTube, most of the initial viewers of Kony2012 were 13-17 years old. Kony2012 drew this audience, too young to even vote, by enlarging its sense of civic possibility – you can help catch Kony, it proclaimed, and here is how you do it. The film’s Hollywood production values and emotional narrative are credited for its appeal, but just as central were its celebrity interlocutors. Would Kony2012 have gone viral without...

[Anne Herzberg is the Legal Advisor at NGO Monitor, a Jerusalem-based research institution. Her post is based on a forthcoming paper (2012), presented at the “Old Laws, New Technologies Conference” sponsored by the Hebrew University Minerva Center for Human Rights and the ICRC (early draft here). Anne is the co-author of Best Practices for Human Rights and Humanitarian NGO Fact-finding (Nijhoff 2012).] Many have commented on the role of social media in facilitating the organized uprisings of the “Arab Spring”. A lesser discussed aspect of those events is the astonishing...

...bridging these diverging trajectories, however, IR and IL can retain salience in an increasingly interconnected world. Reducing complexity is central to social media. The viral campaign by Invisible Children, KONY2012, serves as an obvious example. The campaign efficiently, if brutally, simplified the situation in northern Uganda and areas of Central and Eastern Africa afflicted by Joseph Kony and his Lord’s Resistance Army. While widely discredited after a spectacular series of blunders, Invisible Children’s message is simple, fitting within the 140 character limit of a Twitter post. Its Twitter ‘hashtags’ were...

its 2nd Workshop on Regulation entitled Regulating Lifestyle Risks in Europe: The Case of Alcohol, Tobacco and Unhealthy Diets on September 27-28, 2012. Abstracts between 300-500 words are due by May 22, 2012. Transnational Dispute Management is calling for papers for a special issue on Aligning Human Rights and Investment Protection. Deadline is June 1, 2012. Charles R. Majinge at LSE is collecting papers for a Liber Amicorum for Adama Dieng, ICTR Registrar. The deadline is June 30, 2012. Undergraduate and postgraduate students can send in papers of maximum 35...