A Different View of the Aggression Activation Negotiations – A Perspective from the Ground

A Different View of the Aggression Activation Negotiations – A Perspective from the Ground

[Gregory Gordon is Associate Professor of Law at the Chinese University of Hong Kong]

I’m here on the ground in New York and I want to provide an additional perspective on Kevin’s post. First, the document he has posted is strictly a transitory draft meant only to facilitate discussion. In no way does it necessarily represent any hardened position of the delegates. From what I understand, there is no consensus on it and the parties have moved on from it.

Second, even if it did represent the final word, his understanding about OP(1)(a) and (b) is not necessarily accurate. ICC-ASP/16/L.9/Rev.1 OP (1)(a) only acknowledges the position of those States Parties (i.e., the UK/France camp), which is already reflected in the Report on the facilitation, statements made here upon adoption of any resolution, or by letter to the ASP by 31 December 2018. Subsection (b) applies only to the States Parties referred to in (a). Kevin provides his interpretation that “they” extends to all other States Parties. But the understanding of folks here on the ground is that (b) is limited to those States Parties in (a).

Kevin is entitled to his interpretation — but it does not seem to accord with the tenor of negotiations. Moreover – and this is very important – and in all due respect to Kevin – at this point, it is not helpful to speculate on either the process or substance of negotiations that remain active and have a way to go prior to a final decision (either way) by States Parties. I appreciate that he is trying to stimulate interested discussion – that’s his right – but given the delicate nature of negotiations, public comment could have a potentially misleading and unintended detrimental effect. ICC-ASP/16/L.9/Rev.1, which Kevin has posted in its entirety, was not intended to be publicly released. There are good reasons for that. Many of us here are hoping that this delicate negotiation process will lead to an outcome that will contribute toward the progressive development of international criminal law. Let us hope those delicate negotiations – still very much in train — come to fruition.

Topics
Courts & Tribunals, Featured, Foreign Relations Law, International Criminal Law, International Human Rights Law, National Security Law
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