International Law Weekend 2016

by Chris Borgen

International Law Weekend, the annual conference of the American Branch of the International Law Association is fast approaching. See the following notice from ABILA:

International Law Weekend 2016

Registration is now open for International Law Weekend 2016.

International Law Weekend 2016 – the premiere international law event of the Fall season – will be held October 27-29, 2016, in New York City.  The Opening Panel will take place on Thursday evening at the New York City Bar Association.  The Friday and Saturday sessions will be held at Fordham Law School.

You can register for the conference here: http://www.ila-americanbranch.org

The unifying theme for ILW 2016 is International Law 5.0.

The world is changing at an accelerating rate. From technological advances to environmental transformations, international lawyers are forced to confront emerging forces and new scenarios. Even settled principles of law are no longer settled. These tectonic shifts have been felt throughout the geography of international law. Legal professionals at every level – local, national, regional, and international – must change their practice to meet a changing world. Innovation will become necessary for survival.

ILW 2016 will explore these issues through a collection of engaging and provocative panels. A broad array of both public international law and private international law topics will be offered.

We look forward to seeing you at ILW 2016.

By the way, as a Co-rapporteur for the ILA’s Committee on Recognition/Non-Recognition in International Law, I will be on the panel Recognition and Non-Recognition of States and Governments: Current Issues in U.S. Practice on Friday, October 28 at 4:45 pm, along with my Opinio Juris colleague Peggy McGuinness and Brad Roth, both of whom are committee members, and Wladyslaw Czaplinski, the committee’s chairperson. Here’s the panel description:

For over five years the International Law Association’s Committee on Recognition and Non-Recognition has studied how states do or do not recognize other regimes as states and governments. This panel will bring together members from the ILA Committee to discuss the findings of their reports, with a particular focus on emerging issues in U.S. practice, including responses to secessions and unilateral declarations of independence after Kosovo; the problem of two or more regimes claiming to be the government of a single state, and the U.S. domestic effects of non-recognition.
I hope to see you there!
http://opiniojuris.org/2016/09/20/32794/

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