OTP Asks for Perisic Reconsideration — On the Basis of Nothing

OTP Asks for Perisic Reconsideration — On the Basis of Nothing

Fresh from its victory in Sainovic, the ICTY Office of the Prosecutor (OTP) has now asked the Appeals Chamber to reconsider its final judgment in Perisic on the ground that it would be unjust to permit Perisic to remain acquitted. As the legal basis for such reconsideration 11 months after final judgment, the OTP cites…

Precisely nothing.

Which is not surprising, because nothing in the ICTY Statute actually permits such reconsideration. The only provision that deals with reconsideration of Appeals Chamber judgments is Art. 26, which is limited to the discovery of new facts:

Where a new fact has been discovered which was not known at the time of the proceedings before the Trial Chambers or the Appeals Chamber and which could have been a decisive factor in reaching the decision, the convicted person or the Prosecutor may submit to the International Tribunal an application for review of the judgement.

Even more problematic for the OTP, the Appeals Chamber specifically rejected reconsideration of final appeals judgments in Zigic, noting that the victims and the accused “are both entitled to certainty and finality of legal judgments.”

Lacking any legal basis for its request, the OTP does what it always does — invite the Appeals Chamber to engage in what Darryl Robinson has called “victim-centered reasoning” and reconsider Perisic anyway. In the OTP’s words, because Perisic was wrongly decided (according to one iteration of the Appeals Chamber), “the interests of justice for the tens of thousands of victims, substantially outweighs Perisic’s interest in finality of proceedings. Justice must be restored to the victims. Reconsideration is the only way to this end.” Put more simply: forget that inconvenient principle of legality. The demands of justice trump the text of the ICTY Statute.

It’s also worth noting a profound irony at the heart of the OTP’s request. It acknowledges Zigic is against it — so it argues that the Appeals Chamber should disregard Zigic in favour of its earlier decision in Celebici, which held, in another classic example of ignoring the text of the ICTY Statute in favor of its supposed “object and purpose” of combating impunity, that the Appeals Chamber’s “inherent jurisdiction” (of course) empowers it to reconsider any decision, no matter when decided, that “has led to an injustice.” In other words, the OTP is asking the Appeals Chamber to ignore a new decision (Zigic) that rejected an old decision (Celebici) in order to apply a new decision (Sainovic) that rejected an old decision (Perisic). Remarkable.

I would like to predict that the Appeals Chamber will consign this motion to the dustbin where it belongs. But who knows? As Marko Milanovic has pointed out, precedent no longer has much meaning for the Appeals Chamber. The outcome of an appeal now largely turns on which judges are randomly assigned to the panel.

I will be speaking soon on Perisic and Sainovic at a conference on the legacy of the ICTY. With each motion like this one, that legacy becomes a bit more tarnished.

UPDATE: Dov Jacobs adds some important points at Spreading the Jam.

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[…] in light of Sainovic, the ICTY OTP has now filed for reconsideration in the Perisic case itself. As noted by Kevin Jon Heller, there is absolutely no legal basis for such a motion, as it would really be a stretch to consider […]

Manuel Ventura
Manuel Ventura

But when Perišić held that specific direction was required on the basis of nothing… that was ok? (we both know Kevin that Tadić‘s specific direction language cited to nothing)
You can’t have it both ways Kevin.

Manuel Ventura
Manuel Ventura

…except that it’s exactly what it did. Perišić hinged on Tadić as its source for specific direction – and then subsequent cases that merely repeated/and or trace back to it in a footnote trail. In my view, as soon as Tadić falls, then so do the judgments that cite back to it for authority – in the absence of the relevant chamber conducting an independent analysis on the precise issue and basing it on some (any!) source(s) of law. Thus, I urge readers not to take Kevin or my word for it. Read Tadić para. 229 for yourselves and see if you think ‘specific direction’ was firmly based in law: <a>http://www.icty.org/x/cases/tadic/acjug/en/tad-aj990715e.pdf</a&gt;
Now if 10 subsequent cases merely repeat or cite what Tadić said above without any further analysis… does that make it right? I don’t think so.
Unfortunately, Kevin I don’t think we’re ever going to see eye to eye on this issue. It’s good fun though!

Manuel Ventura
Manuel Ventura

My HTML skills have failed me.. here is the correct link to Tadić: http://www.icty.org/x/cases/tadic/acjug/en/tad-aj990715e.pdf

Jacob
Jacob

You might find it interesting that the Sredoje Lukic Defence filed a motion for reconsideration last year before the Appeals Chamber. In its motion the Defence argued, inter alia, that the findings re: specific direction in Lukic&Lukic and Perisic are irreconcilable. The Prosecution then vigorously opposed the motion and the Appeals Chamber denied it for want of jurisdiction…
http://icty.org/x/cases/milan_lukic_sredoje_lukic/acdec/en/130830.pdf

What happened to?
What happened to?

Radovan Karadzic’s comment? It appropriately explained the hypocrisy behind KJH’s criticism of the OTP’s filing.

What happened to?
What happened to?

The deletion was self-serving.  You should have removed the author’s name but left the comment, or, at least, reproduced it. The commenter properly undermined your criticisms by demonstrating how you personally violated your client’s confidence by revealing the fact that he spoke English in a blog posting and how that revelation resulted in decisions detrimental to him. So when you speak about the “rights of the accused”, it is useful to review those comments in the context of your prior history.

What happened to?
What happened to?

Kevin, yes you did and right now you are lying: http://www.icty.org/x/cases/karadzic/acdec/en/090604.pdf. In particular, read paragraph 15.  “With regard to the Appellant’s submission that the evidence relating to his language abilities relied on by the Trial Chamber was outdated, the Appeals Chamber notes that while evidence from many years ago may not be conclusive of present language abilities, it is relevant. In this case, however, while the Trial Chamber took into consideration evidence from 14 to 17 years ago, it also considered more recent evidence. The latter evidence included an account of his meeting with his pro bono legal adviser, Kevin Jon Heller. . .”  What was that evidence? This blog posting: https://opiniojuris.org/2009/01/08/my-soda-with-radovan/ where you pointed out the following “I was also struck by Dr. Karadzic’s evident intelligence.  He speaks very good English, is extremely well-read and articulate, and has a keen interest in world politics.  Indeed, we spent as much time discussing the situation in Gaza as we did the situation in the former FRY.  (We also discussed Monty Python’s Life of Brian, but that is definitely a protected conversation.)” Key lesson, don’t listen to a person preaching the rights of an accused when in turn he uses his clients… Read more »

Bob
Bob

Ok, to come back to the questions raised by Kevin originally: I agree that in light of the ICTY and ICTR Appeals Chambers’ case-law on reconsideration (last confirmed in the Lukic and Lukic matter), the Prosecution will have a hard time persuading the Chamber to reconsider. However, it is worth noting that the reconsideration standard itself, and especially tied with the overly restrictive approach to a review, is problematic. The Appeals Chamber has said it will not reconsider its final decisions. But this means, as Judge Shahabuddeen and in fact Judge Meron have pointed out in previous “declarations” that there is no remedy for an accused if for instance it turns out that the murder victims are all alive. This would not be an issue for review because review under the ICTY standard presupposes a new fact, which is defined as a a fact not at issue in the judgment from which review is sought. Of course, the fact that people were killed and their identity would then not be a new fact. So the reconsideration standard cuts both ways.  An accused could not seek reconsideration even if all the charges turn out be fabricated, conversely (see Blaskic), the Prosecution… Read more »

G
G

I would be interested to know which conference on the ICTY Legacy you will be speaking at.

Bob
Bob

Kevin,  the “fact at issue” standard is not a hypothetical standard. It’s ICTY case law. See for instance the decision in Blaskic:  14. The Appeals Chamber recalls that a new fact within the meaning of Article 26 of the Statute and Rules 119 and 120 of the Rules refers to “new information of an evidentiary nature of a fact that was not in issue during the trial or appeal proceedings”.  This “means that it must not have been among the factors that the deciding body could have taken into account in reaching its verdict.,, In other words, “[ w ] hat is relevant is whether the deciding body [ … ] knew about the fact or not” in arriving at its decision. 15. In light of its past jurisprudence, the Appeals Chamber considers that the test for determining whether a fact proffered in a review proceeding is actually “new” is as follows: the key concern is that it must not have been in issue during the original proceedings. (http://www.icty.org/x/cases/blaskic/acdec/en/061123.pdf) There is a good article on this here: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=1688132 So with respect to the issue of murder victims, it would be impossible to seek review on that basis, even if all victims all alive — because this fact (the… Read more »

Dov Jacobs

As I point out on my blog, I also think a key issue is, assuming that there would be a right to request reconsideration, whether the Prosecutor can invoke it, or whether it would be exclusively for the defendant to avoid wrongful convictions. I personally think that only the defendant can invoke it (and this seems to have been the basis for the reasoning in Celebici). The notion of “miscarriage of justice” is there to protect the rights of the defendant against the failures of the system that would be detrimental to him (and the Prosecutor IS part of the system). I don’t think it can apply, as the Prosecutor tries to do, to the general sense of justice of the victims. Perisic’s acquittal might be painful for them, but the fact is that they have no rights as parties in ICTY proceedings, nor is the Prosecutor entitled to represent them.