Search: kony 2012

[Kjetil Mujezinović Larsen is Professor of Law, Director of Research, and Deputy Director, at the Norwegian Centre for Human Rights at the University of Oslo. He is the author of «The Human Rights Treaty Obligations of Peacekeepers» (Cambridge, 2012). This post is a part of the Protection of Civilians Symposium.] By way of introduction, let me state that I agree with Marten’s analysis of the legal obligations of peacekeepers. Therefore, rather than rehearsing the arguments raised by the other contributors to this Symposium, I want to address a concrete issue...

...searches are encouraging. Between January 1, 2011 and February 21, 2012, US federal courts cited the Hague Service Convention in 122 cases; they cited the Hague Evidence Convention in 65 cases; they cited the Child Abduction Convention in 55 cases; and they cited the CISG in 20 cases. None of those cases includes a citation to Medellín. During the same period, US federal courts cited the New York Convention in 66 cases and the Warsaw Convention in 37 cases. One of the New York Convention cases and two of the...

The International Olympic Committee will allow marathoner Guor Marial to compete as a man without a country. From the IOC’s executive board summary of its decision in the case: Passport-less athlete approved to compete The EB also approved a request to allow marathon runner Guor Marial to compete in the London 2012 Games as an Independent Olympic Athlete (IOA) under the Olympic flag. Marial was born in what is now South Sudan, which does not currently have a recognised National Olympic Committee. The athlete, who does not hold a passport...

...2008. There is no question that Hartmann knowingly violated Tribunal rules. But that doesn’t mean she should be criminally prosecuted. Indeed, given that her disclosures seemingly revealed nothing new, her prosecution only makes the Tribunal seem petty and vindictive, more interested in silencing an insider critic than doing justice. Just last week, the President of the ICTY, Patrick Robinson, told the Security Council that the Tribunal would not complete its first-instance trials until 2012 at the earliest — four years behind schedule. Given the Tribunal’s workload, prosecuting Hartmann hardly seems...

...clauses in respect of the bank’s interests in Greek government bonds (“GGBs”) that were exchanged in 2012. Beyond the headline, the decision is an important reminder that not every kind of asset qualifies as a protected investment under a potentially applicable investment treaty or the ICSID Convention, and of the basic yet fundamental rule of treaty interpretation that a BIT’s terms must be interpreted in good faith within their context and in light of the treaty’s object and purpose. More generally, the conclusion by a majority of the Tribunal that...

...states in the region. In 2012, the “Control Law for the Integral Defence of Venezuelan Air Space” authorized attacks against “hostile” aircraft, defined as “[a]ll aircraft (…) travelling through or located in [Venezuelan] airspace or territory, in breach of provisions related to aerial circulation established in this law, or when there are sufficient motives that allow to presume that said aircraft is being used with different purposes than those it was authorized for”. In late 2013, the Venezuelan air force shot down a civilian aircraft with Mexican registry, alleging it...

[ William S. Dodge is The Honorable Roger J. Traynor Professor of Law and Associate Dean for Research at the University of California, Hastings College of the Law. From August 2011 to July 2012, he served as Counselor on International Law to the Legal Adviser at the U.S. Department of State, where he worked on the amicus briefs of the United States in Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum Co. The views expressed here are his own and do not necessarily reflect the views of the State Department or of the...

...One could refer to the Genocide case before the International Court of Justice in 2007 and the case Belgium v. Senegal in 2012 before the same Court. This shows that there is a persistent obligation to ensure accountability for core international crimes in International Law although the States rarely face the consequences for not fulfilling this obligation. The fact that the duty to end impunity could find legal bases in International Law means that mechanisms to ensure State responsibility could be triggered, including the whole set of possible measures that...

...and Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb, between January 2012 and April 2013, women and girls were subjected to a veritable policy of forced relationships, referred to as “marriages” by the groups. UN reports on the situation in Mali at the time were replete with cruel details of forced relationships, describing how women and girls were “often ‘married’ to several rebels in camps, where they are gang-raped every night and then abandoned after a swift divorce.” In the arrest warrant for Al Hassan issued in March 2018, a Pre-Trial Chamber...

...guilty, on 14 March 2012, of conscripting and enlisting children under the age of 15 and using them to participate in hostilities in the Ituri region in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, from 1 September 2002 to 13 August 2003. Readers can find an excellent summary of the decision at IntLawGrrls here. Fourteen years seems about right given the relatively unserious nature of the war-crimes charges against Lubanga (compared to things like murder and rape), although the sentence no doubt comes as a disappointment to the OTP, which asked...

Calls for applications The 11th Annual Conference of the European Society of International Law will take place in Oslo, Norway, from September 10-12, 2015. The conference will be hosted by the PluriCourts Center on the Legitimate Roles on the Judiciary in the Global Order, University of Oslo. Entitled “The Judicialization of International Law – A Mixed Blessing?”, the conference will address the international law aspects of the increased judicialization from an interdisciplinary perspective. The conference will feature plenary sessions with invited speakers, and a number of agorae with...

On February 10, 2012, the University of Georgia is going to have the honor of hosting the Annual Meeting of the Junior International Law Scholars Association (JILSA). JILSA is a U.S.-based informal support network and community for untenured international law scholars. With almost 200 scholars on the email list, JILSA facilitates syllabi exchanges, summer brown bags, and informal dinners and lunches at international law events. JILSA also holds an annual meeting, the centerpiece of which is a paper workshop, in which junior scholars are given the opportunity to present and...