Archive of posts for category
International Criminal Law

The Gaza Report’s Treatment of Warnings: A Response to Blank

by Kevin Jon Heller

Laurie Blank published a post yesterday at Lawfare entitled “The UN Gaza Report: Heads I Win, Tails You Lose.” The post accuses the Independent Commission of Inquiry’s report on Operation Protective Edge (“Gaza Report”) of “completely undermin[ing] the foundational notion of equal application of the law” with regard to three areas of IHL: warnings, civilian vs military objects, and compliance. None of Blank’s criticisms are convincing, but in this post I want to focus solely on her first topic, warnings. Here is what she says about the Commission’s discussion of whether Israel complied with its obligation under IHL to provide civilians in Gaza with “effective advance warning” prior to attack:

First, consider the report’s treatment of warnings, one of the precautions set out in Article 57 of Additional Protocol I.  Article 57 mandates that when launching attacks, “effective advance warning shall be given of attacks which may affect the civilian population, unless circumstances do not permit.”  The Commission examines Israel’s warnings in great detail, including leaflets, telephone calls, texts and roof-knocks, noting that the warnings often did lead to successful evacuation and save many lives.  However, the Commission found in many cases that specific phone warnings were not effective as required by LOAC, because the individuals in the targeted building would not know “in what direction to escape.” (¶ 237).

However, LOAC contains no requirement that the civilian population be able to act on the warnings in order to find them effective.  Instead, the legally correct approach is to examine whether the warnings generally informed civilians that they were at risk and should seek shelter. In other words, the legal issue is whether they were effective in transmitting a warning, not whether the civilians actually heeded them. The Israel Defense Forces routinely made individualized, specific phone calls to warn the residents of buildings to seek safety in advance of an attack on a particular building, far exceeding the requirements of LOAC. Yet the Commission bases its conclusions on the post-hoc question of whether civilians actually found shelter, which ultimately depends on a host of considerations outside the control of the attacking party.

Unfortunately, both paragraphs misrepresent the Gaza Report. Let’s consider Blank’s claims one-by-one.

[T]he Commission found in many cases that specific phone warnings were not effective as required by LOAC, because the individuals in the targeted building would not know “in what direction to escape.”

The Israel Defense Forces routinely made individualized, specific phone calls to warn the residents of buildings to seek safety in advance of an attack on a particular building, far exceeding the requirements of LOAC.

These statements are misleading. The subsection of the Gaza Report that Blank criticises focuses on Israel’s controversial use of “roof knocking,” not on its use of phone calls to civilians located in or near buildings about to be attacked. (The subsection is entitled “Roof Knock Warnings.”) Indeed, the entire point of the subsection is to explain why roof-knocking does not provide civilians with effective advance notice unless it is combined with a phone call or “other specific warnings” (¶ 239). Blank does not challenge the Commission’s conclusion in that regard. She does not even acknowledge it…

Remembering Mike Lewis

by Chris Borgen

We are very sorry to mark the passing of Professor Michael W. Lewis of Ohio Northern University.

Mike spoke and wrote with rare authority as someone who was not only a leading international law and national security scholar who engaged in broader public discourse (see his many debates, presentations, and interviews), but also as a former Naval aviator and TOPGUN graduate, who had flown F-14’s in Desert Shield and enforced no-fly zones over Iraq.

More than most, Mike appreciated how international law was actually operationalized.

We at Opinio Juris benefited from Mike’s frequent contributions to the discussion, with posts and comments on issues such as the relationship between Additional Protocols I and II,  on various aspects of drone warfare (see, for example, 1, 2, and 3), and on  “elongated imminence” and self-defenseBobby Chesney and Peter Margulies have also posted remembrances about Mike Lewis at Lawfare.

On a more personal note, I remember the first time I met Mike in person, perhaps ten years ago, at a dinner at a national security law conference. He was a great conversationalist, speaking about the need to crystallize key principles of international law in a manner that would be immediately usable by the pilots and flight crews who were actually flying sorties.

His voice was unique and it will be missed.

Fourth Annual Junior Faculty Forum for International Law

by Kevin Jon Heller

The forum is being held this week in Florence, Italy. Here is the description:

The Annual Junior Faculty Forum for International Law was launched in the summer of 2011. It held its inaugural event at the New York University School of Law in May 2012; the second Forum was held at the University of Nottingham in May 2013 and the third (and most recent) Forum occurred at the University of Melbourne in July 2014. The Forum is designed as a regular addition to the international law calendar; its founding co-convenors are Dino Kritsiotis, Professor of Public International Law in the University of Nottingham, Anne Orford, Michael D. Kirby Professor of International Law in the University of Melbourne, and J.H.H. Weiler, President of the European University Institute in Florence. The Forum will allow international legal scholars, in the first six years of their academic career, a unique opportunity to present their research work by being paired with a senior scholar in the field of international law or related fields, who will lead a discussion of their presentation within the Forum.

The fourth Forum will convene at the European University Institute in June 2015, and selected presentations from the Forum will be published in the European Journal of International Law (Oxford University Press), a practice established from the inaugural Forum.

The young scholars invited to participate this year are: Rohini Sen (O.P. Jindal Global), Kristina Daugirdas (Michigan), Ingo Venzke (Amsterdam), Anne-Charlotte Martineau (Max Planck), Oisin Suttle (Sheffield), Nicolas M. Perrone (Universidad Externado de Colombia), Deborah Whitehall (Monash), Anna Dolidze (Western), Mieke van der Linden (Max Planck), Arman Sarvarian (Surrey), Surabhi Ranganathan (Warwick), Philippa Webb (King’s College), and Maria Varaki (Kadir Has).

It should be an excellent forum. I hope readers who are young academics will consider applying for the fifth one!

Guest Post: Exploring Legal Rationales for South Africa’s Failure to Arrest al-Bashir

by Asad Kiyani

[Asad Kiyani (LL.B (Osgoode); LL.M (Cambridge) is a PhD Candidate at the University of British Columbia (UBC).]

While social and traditional media have been flooded with complaints about South Africa’s recent failure to arrest Omar al-Bashir, legal analysis of the situation has been lacking. Many have insisted that the reluctance to arrest al-Bashir is  ‘the impunity club’ disregarding legal principle and undermining the rule of law.

Yet, given the widespread insistence that the ICC has jurisdiction over Bashir and he must be arrested by anyone who can do so, there is a remarkable lack of agreement on exactly how the treaty-based ICC has jurisdiction over the sitting head of state of a country that has not ratified said treaty, and when that head of state is protected by customary law immunities (see Gaeta vs Akande, which inspired my article on the same).

For reasons of space, this post does not address the claim that there is already a rule of customary international law that provides an exception to head of state immunity. That position frequently involves the same errors: conflating the immunities of former heads of state (such as Pinochet) with incumbent heads of state, and conflating the elimination of the substantive defence of official capacity with elimination of the procedural bar of immunities. Nor does it deal with peace versus justice arguments, the specificities of South African constitutional law, or perhaps the more promising, genocide-based arguments in favour of arresting al-Bashir highlighted by Göran Sluiter. Instead, this post problematises the assertion that states refusing to arrest al-Bashir have no legal legs to stand on by highlighting four interrelated public international law issues raised by the legal pursuit of al-Bashir.

(1) There has been no reconciliation of the apparent internal contradictions in the Rome Statute: that states are obligated to carry out ICC decisions while also respecting the customary duties they owe to other states, particularly third-party states. Article 27(2) of the Rome Statute waives states’ customary protections of immunities. At the same time, Article 98(1) states that persons clothed in immunity can only be arrested by or surrendered to the Court if “the Court can first obtain the cooperation of that third State for the waiver of the immunity.”

Sudan has clearly not consented to this waiver, and is not cooperating with the Court to waive al-Bashir’s immunity. At the same time, the Court insists that al-Bashir is to be arrested. Thus States Parties to the ICC are faced with competing obligations written into the Statute itself: to arrest al-Bashir while also observing his immunity from arrest. Arguments that there is no contradiction nullify these important provisions of the Rome Statute, and ignore the treaty-law implications of doing so.

(2) Importantly, the Article 98(1) provision is not just a treaty-based rule; it is the assertion of pre-existing principles of public international law that (a) preclude placing treaty obligations on third-party states, and (b) recognize customary law immunities. Thus, even if the Court were to interpret Article 98(1) differently, or the Assembly of State Parties were to delete it from the Rome Statute (a virtual impossibility), the same restrictions would still apply to states such as South Africa because those rules exist in international law independent of the Rome Statute.

These restrictions also apply to the Security Council, even when acting under Chapter VII. While the Security Council has extensive powers in international law, the general scholarship (see, e.g., herehereherehere, and here) and jurisprudence makes clear that – contrary to Jens Ohlin’s interpretation of Article 103 of the UN Charter – the Council is restrained by the norms of customary international law. Thus, as far as al-Bashir goes, it makes no difference that the Council referred Darfur to the ICC through a Chapter VII resolution. Insisting that Chapter VII can override customary international law – no matter how awful the person protected by it may be – collapses the agreement/custom distinction first made in Article 103 of the Charter and preserved in Article 98 of the Rome Statute. Additionally, it raises the question of what legal limitations do exist on the Council, and how this interpretation fits with the Tadić court’s view (here at para. 28).

Of course, this does not render Security Council referrals null – it simply restricts the pool of situations that the Council may refer to the Court. (more…)

Guest Post: Revoking Citizenship of Foreign Fighters: Implications for the Jurisdiction of the International Criminal Court

by Ailsa McKeon

[Ailsa McKeon is a BA/LLB (Hons I) from the University of Queensland.]

Growing numbers of men and women are travelling to the Middle East to fight for ‘ISIS’. Political figures from several Western nations, including Australia, the UK, Canada and Norway, have publicly asserted that these individuals should be stripped of citizenship of their countries of origin to protect, punish and deter. Yet, however well-intentioned this strategy may appear, it could also have negative consequences for the ICC’s jurisdiction if these individuals are accused of crimes within its remit.

Revocation of citizenship is contrary to international law if it renders any individual stateless. It is possible nonetheless, as shown, for example, by Burma/Myanmar’s treatment of Rohingya people. The idea is less controversial when applied to those with multiple nationalities who would retain at least one. Regardless, revocation of citizenship in any case would be a complicating factor for ICC jurisdiction.

Art 25(1) of the Rome Statute gives the ICC jurisdiction over natural persons only. Art 12 sets out the preconditions for the ICC’s exercise of jurisdiction in relation to the crimes specified in Art 5(1). Essentially, it requires the State on whose territory the relevant conduct occurred, or of which the person accused of the crime is a national, to be a party to the Rome Statute or to have consented to the Court’s jurisdiction in respect of the particular crime alleged. The exception is where the UN Security Council, acting under Chapter VII of the UN Charter, refers a situation to the Prosecutor in which a crime within the ICC’s competence appears to have been committed. The ICC can then exercise jurisdiction whether or not the relevant State is a party. However, such referrals may be impeded by the exercise of the veto power by any of the five permanent Security Council members.

Where an individual commits acts alleged to constitute crimes within the ICC’s jurisdiction before revocation, they can be pursued as a national of a ratifying nation based on Art 12(1): that is, at the time the crime is said to have been committed, the person was a national of a State Party, which, by becoming a State Party, accepted the court’s jurisdiction over its territory and nationals. Subsequent withdrawal of citizenship cannot change that. However, the ability later to exercise that jurisdiction is a distinct issue, as will be discussed below in relation to Art 127.

In the reverse situation, where an individual commits such conduct only after withdrawal of citizenship of a State Party, the existence of jurisdiction is unlikely. It seems that in the continued absence of territorial jurisdiction, the ICC would be unable to commence proceedings due to lacking jurisdiction ratione personae. This challenging prospect presently confronts the ICC, as Western nations foreshadow action to revoke citizenship of foreign fighters. Prosecutor Bensouda released a statement in April 2015 indicating that, although the situation continues to be monitored, the Office of the Prosecutor is not currently in a position to commence investigation or prosecution of any individual involved with ISIS from a State party. As the Prosecutor observes, neither Iraq nor Syria (nor many of their neighbouring States) is party to the Rome Statute: as such, the ICC would rely on personal jurisdiction to prosecute any foreign fighter alleged to be most responsible for mass crimes. In the event that personal jurisdiction is removed, the ICC would be rendered powerless over such individuals.

The situation with respect to crimes continuing either side of revocation is more indeterminate, in the same manner as continuing crimes commenced prior to the Rome Statute’s entry into force. This is relevant because the precise point at which revocation of citizenship would take effect with respect to any particular individual under various national legislative regimes is unknown.

The most direct analogy as to loss of jurisdiction over continuing crimes arises under the Statute of the ICTR. (Similar circumstances affect the ECCC, however the issue has not been addressed there.) Art 7 defines the ICTR’s temporal jurisdiction to “extend to a period beginning on 1 January 1994 and ending on 31 December 1994”. The ICTR held in the Nahimana appeal that “[criminal] responsibility could not be based on criminal conduct prior to 1 January 1994, but… evidence of pre-1994 acts could nonetheless have probative value”. However, nothing was said in that case of conduct occurring after 31 December 1994; the same conclusion cannot necessarily be drawn regarding the evidentiary value of subsequent conduct as to possible earlier criminality in this context. Regardless, this ruling seems to confirm the view that jurisdictional limits are applied strictly, even for continuing crimes that are commenced before, but not completed until after, jurisdiction is removed. Loss of jurisdiction by the ICC would therefore prevent determination of culpability or innocence.

A less obvious parallel may be drawn with the law of diplomatic protection. Where an individual with immunity loses nationality of the State from which it was derived prior to commencement of criminal proceedings, the individual will also lose the protection of that State in respect of a wrong they committed while its national. As a result, proceedings may ensue against an individual who had held diplomatic protection at the time of allegedly committing a wrong, where otherwise they could not. However, that situation is distinguishable from the one of present concern: there, a pre-existing bar is removed so that jurisdiction is allowed, while in the case of revocation of citizenship, jurisdiction exists until its substratum is displaced by the revocation. This does not speak in favour of ICC jurisdiction existing in respect of continuing crimes where the elements of the crime are not complete until after citizenship is revoked.

A contrasting analogy may be made with the withdrawal of ratification of the Rome Statute. Art 127(2) states:

“… [a State Party’s] withdrawal shall not affect any cooperation with the Court in connection with criminal investigations and proceedings in relation to which the withdrawing State had a duty to cooperate and which were commenced prior to the date on which the withdrawal became effective, nor shall it prejudice the continued consideration of any matter which was already under consideration by the Court prior to the date on which the withdrawal became effective.”

This provision foresees politically-motivated withdrawals and operates so that the ICC retains the ability to exercise jurisdiction over individuals already being investigated or prosecuted, despite the State Party’s ouster of its jurisdiction otherwise. Art 127 explicitly applies only to State Party withdrawal from the entire Rome Statute, operating to displace the rebuttable presumption that a treaty cannot be denounced unilaterally unless it is shown that this possibility was intended by the parties or that a right of withdrawal exists by implication from express terms.

The obverse consequence implied by Art 127(2) is that proceedings may not be commenced in the ICC in respect of the territory or nationals of a State that has withdrawn with effect as per Art 127(1). This position seems also to apply to persons whose citizenship of a State Party has been revoked, even where a continuing crime was allegedly commenced while citizenship of a State Party remained in force, for the reason observed earlier that such jurisdiction has been lost by the time the crime is complete. Further, given its specificity, Art 127 cannot be applied directly to revocation of citizenship to suggest that jurisdiction will continue over individuals whose investigation or prosecution has been commenced, but whose citizenship is subsequently revoked. Rather, in the absence of express provision to that effect, it appears that proceedings would have to be abandoned. This proposition is confirmed by the terms of Art 12(2), which relevantly provides that “the Court may exercise its jurisdiction if… the State of which the person accused of the crime is a national” is a State Party or has accepted the jurisdiction of the Court in accordance with Art 12(3). Although the crime remains within the ICC’s competence, personal jurisdiction is absent where the person is no longer a national of a ratifying State.

Were any ratifying nation to follow through with revoking a foreign fighter’s citizenship, it is arguable that this act would breach the obligation under Art 86, “in accordance with the provisions of [the] Statute, [to] cooperate fully with the Court in its investigation and prosecution of crimes within the jurisdiction of the Court.” In fact, it would make it substantially more difficult for the ICC to pursue individuals suspected of involvement in the most egregious crimes where those crimes are not commenced or completed until after the revocation.

This issue is a live one. Foreign fighters are firmly positioned within ISIS’s leadership structure and in active operations, while allegations of war crimes and crimes against humanity have already been made against the group. There is a clear possibility that foreign fighters may warrant investigation and prosecution by domestic or international authorities. It should therefore be of concern that an essentially administrative act by a State Party may seriously impede ICC involvement where a State is unwilling or unable to proceed.

Guest Post: International Criminal Justice and Reconciliation: Beyond the Retributive vs. Restorative Divide (Part 2 of 2)

by Carsten Stahn

[Carsten Stahn is Professor of International Criminal Law and Global Justice and Programme Director of the Grotius Centre for International Studies.This two-part post is based on a talk given at the seminar on Reconciliation v. Accountability: Balancing Interests of Peace and Justice, organized by the Centre for International Law Research and Policy on 29 May 2015 at the Peace Palace. Part 1 can be found here.]

2. International Criminal Justice and Reconciliation: Improving Connections

It is easy to criticize international criminal justice for its shortcomings. A hard question is: How can the connection between international criminal justice be improved?

Existing studies have expressed doubts to what extent international criminal trials have promoted a ‘thicker’ conception of individual, inter-group or inter-societal reconciliation, at least in the short or medium term. International trials have limited the space for denial of atrocities and created a public space and reference point to confront history, which is one pre-requisite for societal transformation. In past years, international courts have sought to address their limitations through greater investment in restorative features (i.e., victim participation, compensatory justice), complementarity strategies, and education and outreach (e.g., legacy). But improvements might start with a closer look at retributive practices and procedures.

2.1.Reconciliatory potential of retributive justice

There is, first of all, a need to reduce practices that undermine the reconciliatory potential of retributive justice.

(I) Judicial Management

One of the most basic lessons is that  criminal courts and tribunals need to complete trials and produce a judicial outcome, in order to have a transformative effect. In existing practice, criticism has focused on the divisive nature of acquittals or dissents. Such judgments may indeed confirm existing societal tensions. But they are not necessarily detrimental to longer-term processes of reconciliation. They represent a legitimate outcome and contribute to the process of truth-finding. More critical are flaws in the justice process as such, i.e., unfinished or derailed proceedings. At the international level, there are number of critical examples over the past decade, including Milošević, Lubanga, or most recently Kenyatta. In a national context, the Rios Montt trial was affected by dilatory tactics and intimidation. Such examples undermine the demonstration effect of justice, and the faith in law and institutions that is necessary for meaningful engagement with the ‘other’.

The prospect of the trial to contribute to reconciliation depends on its acceptance and perception as a common forum. Each trial necessarily involves a certain degree of theatre and drama. International trials can easily turn into show trials, and struggle to confront ideology fueled criminality. These challenges need to be addressed. Judicial proceedings need to provide space to challenge pre-determined attitudes and biases or the heroization of agents, in order to maintain their perception as shared fora. This requires active, and sometimes better judicial management of proceedings, deeper engagement with conflicting visions of history and causes of criminality, and space to highlight and challenge contradictions in ideology-tainted discourse.

(ii) Plea agreements

From a reconciliatory perspective, it seems tempting to encourage plea agreements in proceedings. But this inclination is deceptive. In the early ICTY practice, guilty pleas were used as a means of reconciling punishment with acknowledgment of wrong or apology. Experience has shown that such admissions of guilt cannot be taken at face value. For instance, Mrs Plavsic’s guilty plea in 2003 was initially heralded as a significant move towards the advancement of reconciliation. After sentencing, she retracted her guilty plea and expression of remorse. This experience highlights the fragility of negotiated justice.  If an apology is offered in return for sentence leniency, it might not necessarily benefit reconciliation, and call it into question the genuineness of remorse.

In the ICC context, risks of bargaining are curtailed by greater judicial power, and structural attention to the interests of victims (Art. 65 (4) ICC Statute) But at the Court, similar concerns have arisen in the context of the apology of Katanga. Katanga’s remorse was offered after the sentencing judgment, and before the decision on appeal. It caused resentment among victims, since it was perceived as a tradeoff for the discontinuance of the appeal.

2.2. Justice Approaches

International criminal justice may contribute to break divides, if it makes best use of the constructive tension between retributive and restorative approaches.

(i) Constituency and locality  

A fundamental element is the approach towards constituency and locality. Justice, and in particular, justice in the Hague, must be a two- way street. International proceedings are not merely abstract processes, geared at the interests of the parties or fictive community interests; they require a close nexus  context, and the interests of affected communities and victims. It is this inclusiveness, which connects international criminal justice to processes of reconciliation. In current practice, interaction with the ‘domestic’ or ‘local’ is often characterized by outsourcing, transfer of cases or one-directional communication (e.g., ‘outreach’). The conditions of this relationship, and its transformation over time (e.g., after closure of cases) require further structural attention. Holding local hearings (e.g., Ntaganda) may facilitate visibility and access to victims, and foster the perception that ‘justice is seen to be done’. But it is not in itself sufficient to facilitate a structural dialogue locally.

(ii) Challenging‘friend/enemy’ clusters

Many trials suffer from the reproduction of binaries, and are perceived as obstacles to reconciliation, if they remain entrenched in ‘friend/enemy’ clusters, or associate crime or victimhood across pre-configured collective identities (e.g., ethnic lines). International criminal justice may reduce these frictions, if it pays attention to rights and wrongs of  all sides of the conflict, as mandated by the principle of objectivity (Art. 54 ICC Statute). A positive contribution to reconciliation also requires better engagement with dilemmas of selectivity, and justification of choices (e.g., selection of situations, cases, defendants). Typically, most attention is focused on action. But from a perspective of reconciliation, inaction requires equal attention. It is, in particular, important to communicate that inaction does not entail an endorsement of violations.

(iii) Contradictorial v. adversarial proceedings

International criminal courts have experimented with different types of procedures. Experiences suggest that inquisitorial features may be more closely aligned with rationales of reconciliation. Accusatorial models tend to treat parties to proceedings as adversaries. This structure consolidates binaries, and produces clear winners and losers. This methodology fuels a certain hostility, and stands in tension to a more exploratory mode of inquiry. As noted by Albin Eser, this contradiction could be mitigated, if procedures were construed as ‘contradictorial’, rather than ‘adversarial’, i.e. focused on ‘elucidating the truth by way of  contradiction, including confrontation’ and ‘(controversial) dialogue’ in ‘a spirit of cooperation’, rather than hostile contest. Steps like these would facilitate empathy and potential re-humanization of perpetrators and victims. One of the implicit purposes of these trials is to give back to the victims some of the humanity that they have lost.

(iv) Fact-finding

A last procedural point relates to fact-finding and quality of evidence. Existing practice continues to rely heavily on oral testimony. Testimonial evidence is fragile and limited by epistemic challenges, since it linked to assessments of trustworthiness. This is shown by many examples, internationally and nationally. Some of these vulnerabilities might be limited by creative uses of information technology, and better translation of ‘big data’ into analysis or evidence. International courts and tribunals (e.g., ICC, STL) serve as important pioneers in this field.

2.3. Treatments of Actors

Finally, prospects of reconciliation are closely linked to the experiences of parties and participants in the justice process. Individuals share and digest experiences through narratives. Criminal proceedings may contribute to this process, if parties and participants have the impression that they are listened to.

Some of the most direct transformative effects may occur through the experience of testimony, i.e., the contact and exposure of witnesses or victims to a professional justice environment. Existing practice provides positive and negative examples. Existing experiences might be improved through greater care for witnesses before and after testimony, and better management of victim participation in proceedings, including information, representation  and processes of inclusion and exclusion. Greater caution is required in the use and labeling of victims. Judicial proceedings tend to produce imageries (e.g., vulnerability) and abstract categorizations of victimhood that may have disempowering effects on victims.

One innovative development at the international level is the ICC’s approach towards reparation. It combines retributive and restorative features. It establishes a direct form of  accountability of the convicted person towards victims, which differs from classical models of victim-offender mediation. Accountability is grounded in the obligation to repair harm, but linked to the punitive dimensions of ICC justice (e.g., conviction, sentence). Jurisprudence has made it clear that establishment of accountability towards victims through reparation proceedings is an asset per se that can provide a greater sense of justice to victims, even in cases where the defendant is indigent. Examples like these illustrate some of the strengths and possibilities of international criminal justice.

 3. Not a conclusion

In the future, as in the past, it will remain difficult to demonstrate empirically whether and how international criminal justice contributes positively to reconciliation. This debate is likely to continue. It might be interesting to turn the question around: Would one be better off without international criminal justice? If the question is framed in the negative, the ‘benefit of the doubt’ might gain greater weight.

At least three insights can be drawn now. First, reconciliation is not, and should not necessarily be treated as a primary goal of international criminal justice. The criminal trial is at best one intermediate factor in such a process. Second, the contribution to reconciliation cannot be assessed exclusively through the lens of restorative justice. Some important impulses result from the positive tension between retributive and restorative justice. Third, some of the strengths of international criminal justice lie in its expressivist features and, its ability to serve as experiment for national experiences. These experiences require further translation and/or transformation in a national or local context, rather than mere replication.

Guest Post: International Criminal Justice and Reconciliation: Beyond the Retributive vs. Restorative Divide (Part 1 of 2)

by Carsten Stahn

[Carsten Stahn is Professor of International Criminal Law and Global Justice and Programme Director of the Grotius Centre for International Studies.This two-part post is based on a talk given at the seminar on Reconciliation v. Accountability: Balancing Interests of Peace and Justice, organized by the Centre for International Law Research and Policy on 29 May 2015 at the Peace Palace.]

Introduction

Punishment and reconciliation are closely linked. In this post, I would like to explore one issue of this relationship, namely the link between the retributive and restorative justice. The core dilemma was identified by Hannah Arendt in her treatment of forgiveness in the Human Condition in1958:

 ‘men are unable to forgive what they cannot punish and are unable to punish what turns out to be unforgivable’.

This dichotomy still stands today. Since Nuremberg and Tokyo, there is a strong trend to recognize that the purposes of trials reach beyond retribution and vengeance. International criminal proceedings are increasingly associated with restorative features, because punishment alone has inherent limitations. Some harm may only heal with time. At the same time, certain acts may be beyond forgiveness. This argument is used to discard alternatives to punishment or short cuts to impunity, in particular in relation to core crimes.

These dilemmas arise in any mass atrocity context. They have a legitimate space in law and justice policies. They cannot, and should not be outplayed against each other, but stand in a dialectic relationship. The right equilibrium must be found anew in any specific context, through argument, contestation and persuasion.

The contribution of international criminal justice to reconciliation is modest. Reconciliation has of course many meanings. It extends beyond the victim-offender relationship that forms part of the criminal trial. It involves different levels: interpersonal forgiveness and collective dimensions (e.g., community-based, societal or national reconciliation). It contains retrospective (e.g., understanding of the past, healing, undoing of wrong) and prospective elements (e.g., social repair). Legal visions of time do not necessarily correlate with societal understandings. International criminal justice typically only covers fragments of the past, and glimpses of the imagination of the future.

Unlike a judgment in a trial, reconciliation can rarely be tied to a specific moment in time. It occurs as a process. As argued in the Handbook on Reconciliation after Violent Conflict, it is both a goal, i.e., an ideal state to strive for, and a process ‘through which a society moves from a divided past to a shared future’. It involves ‘social learning’ and a move beyond negative co-existence and the mere absence of conflict. Justice is only one element, alongside others such as the search for truth, forgiveness or healing.

It is questionable to what extent reconciliation should be framed as a primary goal of international criminal justice per se. International criminal justice can neither stop conflict nor create reconciliation. A Court can judge, but only people can build or repair social relations. A Chamber cannot order an apology by the perpetrator, nor forgiveness by victims. In fact, the liberal criminal trial may require respect of the will of those who do not choose to forgive. The experiences in the Balkans, Latin America and Africa have shown that healing and forgiveness are culturally-bound processes that are rooted in local cultures, and start at the level of the individual or community based structures. Reconciliation requires the recognition of a more inclusive common identity that transcends the justice trial. But international criminal law strengthens the claim that reconciliation should not be conceived ‘as an alternative to justice’. Moreover, the criminal trial can provide conditions that facilitate such complex processes. It may signal a rupture with the past that contributes to a process of reconciliation.

In the following, I will try to unpack some of the existing divides. I will first challenge whether restorative approaches are per se better suited to achieve reconciliation than retributive mechanisms. I will then explore certain means to improve the connection between international criminal justice and reconciliation.

1. Links between Reconciliation and Retributive Justice

Retributive justice mechanisms, such as international criminal courts and tribunals, are often criticized for their limitations, namely their emphasis on perpetrators, their individualization of guilt and focus on the past, and their risks. This includes detachment from local context and emphasis on universal justice models and standards. Restorative mechanisms of justice, including victim-centred and less formal forms of accountability, have gained increased acceptance as a middle ground between retributive justice and blanket pardon. They are viewed as more conducive to reconciliation, in light of their stronger focus on needs of victims, their proximity to community or group structures, and their flexibility in terms of process and sanction (e.g., restorative penalties). This either/or logic requires differentiation. Developments over past decades suggest that it is the linkage between these two models that may be most conducive to reconciliation.

1.1.Punishment as prerequisite for reconciliation

One first important point is that prosecution aimed at punishment is not necessarily an obstacle to reconciliation. In certain contexts, retribution may have a greater effect on reconciliation that certain restorative forms of justice that prioritize forgiveness or forgetting. Forgiveness often requires more than a mere apology or generic acknowledgments of responsibility. Victims might be more willing to forgive, or at least temper their feelings of revenge, if they know that the perpetrator will be punished. A recent example is the trial against camp guard Oskar Gröning before German Courts. Ausschwitz survivor Eva Moses Kor shook hands with Gröning. She noted that she could forgive because ‘forgiveness does not absolve the perpetrator from taking responsibility for his actions’ nor diminish the ‘need to know what happened there.’

1.2.‘Us vs. them’ divides

Second, reconciliation is linked to cognitive and affective change, grounded in social interaction. It is shaped by positive experience with the ‘other’ and a relationship of recognition and trust. As argued by Jodi Halpern and Harvey Weinstein, reconciliation ‘shows itself in the degree to which people actually can act as distinct individuals with mutual regard in the real world’. Prosecutor have a tendency to portray perpetrators as persons lacking in humanity. But there are many types of perpetrators in international criminal justice: Political leaders, executers, followers. Alette Smeulers has identified at least nine different species:

 

‘(1) the criminal mastermind; (2) the careerist; (3) the profiteer; (4) the fanatic; (5) the devoted warrior; (6) the professional; (7) the criminal and sadist; (8) the follower; and (9) the compromised perpetrator’.

 

One common feature is that many of them are ‘ordinary’ persons who turn into criminals because of context. International criminal justice offers a space to re-humanize, by breaking some of the inequalities and hierarchies inherent in system criminality, or de-constructing context. As argued by Pablo de Greiff, the Special Rapporteur on the promotion of truth, justice, reparation and guarantees of non-recurrence, the criminal trial provides a forum to discard any ‘implicit claim of superiority made by the criminal’s behaviour’. In specific contexts, the victim and perpetrator (re-)encounter each other as mutual holders of rights, or as members of a common polity. These structural features can lay important foundations for longer-term processes of social repair or reconciliation. They can break up ‘us vs. them’ divides.

1.3.Acceptance of multiple truths

A third point relates to the relationship between reconciliation and truth-finding. One of the inherent features of a criminal trial is that it can produce different narratives, or even multiple truths, through assigned roles in the legal process, competing testimonies or conflicting decisions. International criminal justice is paved with such examples. It has produced many frustrating experiences for victims of crime. But this is not necessarily an impediment to healing or forgiveness. Reconciliation is not linked to the acceptance of a ‘single truth’ or narrative, but grounded in the acceptance or toleration of conflicting points of view. It lives from the ability to respect the ‘other’ and tolerate difference, despite opposite or conflicting views of events and facts. The strength of the criminal process lies in the fact that it offers a forum where contradictions and contestations may legitimately co-exist, based on the constraints of the law.

New Edited Collection on the ICC

by Kevin Jon Heller

Oxford University Press has just published a massive new book on the ICC, “The Law and Practice of the International Criminal Court,” edited by Leiden’s Carsten Stahn. Here is the publisher’s description:

The International Criminal Court is a controversial and important body within international law; one that is significantly growing in importance, particularly as other international criminal tribunals close down. After a decade of Court practice, this book takes stock of the activities of the International Criminal Court, identifying the key issues in need of re-thinking or potential reform. It provides a systematic and in-depth thematic account of the law and practice of the Court, including its changes context, the challenges it faces, and its overall contribution to international criminal law. The book is written by over forty leading practitioners and scholars from both inside and outside the Court. They provide an unparallelled insight into the Court as an institution, its jurisprudence, the impact of its activities, and its future development.

The work addresses the ways in which the practice of the International Criminal Court has emerged, and identifies ways in which this practice could be refined or improved in future cases. The book is organised along six key themes: (i) the context of International Criminal Court investigations and prosecutions; (ii) the relationship of the Court to domestic jurisdictions; (iii) prosecutorial policy and practice; (iv) the applicable law; (v) fairness and expeditiousness of proceedings; and (vi) its impact and lessons learned. It shows the ways in which the Court has offered fresh perspectives on the theorization and conception of crimes, charges and individual criminal responsibility. It examines the procedural framework of the Court, including the functioning of different stages of proceedings. The Court’s decisions have significant repercussions: on domestic law, criminal theory, and the law of other international courts and tribunals. In this context, the book assesses the extent to which specific approaches and assumptions, both positive and negative, regarding the potential impact of the Court are in need of re-thinking. This book will be essential reading for practitioners, scholars, and students of international criminal law.

The book includes my essay on Regulation 55 and an essay on co-perpetration by Jens. At £195, most people won’t be able to buy a copy. But four chapters are available for free download and most libraries are sure to acquire it.

Congratulations to Carsten on a tremendous accomplishment!

Appeals Chamber Fails To See the Forest — Complementarity Edition

by Kevin Jon Heller

Earlier this week, the Appeals Chamber rejected Cote d’Ivoire’s challenge to the admissibility of the case against Simone Gbagbo. The challenge was based on Gbagbo’s 20-year sentence for disturbing the peace, forming and organising armed gangs, and undermining state security. Like the Pre-Trial Chamber, the Appeals Chamber concluded that Gbagbo’s domestic convictions failed to satisfy Art. 17’s “same conduct” requirement, making her case admissible. Here are the key paragraphs:

99. The Pre-Trial Chamber found that the conduct underlying the alleged economic crimes was “clearly of a different nature” from the conduct alleged in the proceedings before the Court, and therefore “irrelevant”.171 The Pre-Trial Chamber further found that according to the documentation provided by Côte d’Ivoire, in particular Annex 8 to the Admissibility Challenge, the alleged conduct was characterised as [REDACTED].172 In view of the description of the alleged acts provided in the material submitted by Côte d’Ivoire, the Appeals Chamber finds that it was not unreasonable for the Pre-Trial Chamber to find this conduct to be of a different nature to Ms Gbagbo’s alleged conduct in relation to the crimes against humanity of murder, rape and other forms of sexual violence, persecution and other inhumane acts, on the basis of which the Warrant of Arrest was issued against her by the Court. In addition, Côte d’Ivoire does not explain why “excessively rigid distinction” between the crimes allegedly investigated domestically and those before the Court is erroneous.

100. As regards crimes against the State, the Pre-Trial Chamber noted that in the domestic proceedings it is alleged that Ms Gbagbo [REDACTED].173 The Pre-Trial Chamber further noted that, in the domestic proceedings, “there are references to, inter alia, the allegations of [REDACTED].174 The Pre-Trial Chamber observed that the provisions criminalising such alleged conduct are included in the section of the Ivorian Criminal Code concerning felonies and misdemeanours against the safety of the State, the national defence and the public security.175 The Pre-Trial Chamber concluded that the alleged conduct only includes [REDACTED] and therefore the domestic proceedings in question “do not cover the same conduct” that is alleged in the case before the Court.176 The Appeals Chamber finds that it was not unreasonable for the Pre-Trial Chamber to find, on the basis of the description of the alleged conduct contained in the documents provided by Côte d’Ivoire, read in light of the applicable provisions of the Ivorian Criminal Code, that this conduct, characterised as infringing [REDACTED], is not the same as that alleged before the Court. In addition, as indicated earlier, Côte d’Ivoire does not explain why “excessively rigid distinction” between the crimes allegedly investigated domestically and those before the Court is erroneous.

I have no doubt that the Appeals Chamber’s application of the “same conduct” requirement is correct. But I think it is important to once again ask a basic question about the requirement: what does the ICC gain by insisting that Cote d’Ivoire surrender Gbagbo to the Court to face a second prosecution? 20 years is a significant sentence — five years longer than Lubanga’s, and eight years longer than Katanga’s. Even if the OTP manages to convict Gbagbo, she is very unlikely to receive a substantially longer sentence. So why should the ICC waste the OTP’s precious and overstretched resources by trying Gbagbo again?

My answer, not surprisingly, remains the same: it shouldn’t. The ICC simply cannot afford the kind of hyper-formalism that underlies the “same conduct” requirement. As I have argued elsewhere, the Court should defer to any national prosecution that results in a sentence equal to or longer than the sentence the suspect could expect to receive at the ICC, even if the national prosecution is based on completely different conduct than the ICC’s prosecution.

In fairness to the Appeals Chamber, it’s worth noting that Gbagbo’s attorney challenged the Pre-Trial Chamber’s application of the “same conduct” requirement; she did not challenge the requirement itself. That’s a shame, because I think Gbagbo’s case perfectly illustrates why the Appeals Chamber should jettison the “same conduct” requirement. Would it? Probably not — as I note in my article, the requirement does have a clear textual basis in Art. 20 of the Rome Statute (“upward” ne bis in idem). But the Appeals Chamber has proven remarkably willing to ignore the Rome Statute when it proves inconvenient, so it would have been worth a shot — especially as the “same conduct” requirement is fundamentally inconsistent with the principle of complementarity’s emphasis on the ICC being a court of last resort . At the very least, challenging the requirement would have forced the Appeals Chamber to explain why the requirement’s waste of OTP resources is warranted. I would have liked to read that explanation.

Guest Post: Five Questions on the Colombian Sentencing Practice and the Principle of Complementarity under the Rome Statue

by Marina Aksenova

[Marina Aksenova is a post-doc in the Centre for Excellence for International Courts, Faculty of Law, University of Copenhagen.]

The ICC prosecution team has been conducting preliminary examinations in Colombia for over ten years and has yet to decide whether to move to the stage of formal investigations. In doing so, it must assess, among other things, whether reduced or suspended sentences rendered to senior perpetrators by the local judiciary are adequate in light of the gravity of the crimes committed during the continuing civil war. The ICC prosecution noted in its 2012 report on Colombia that some paramilitaries may benefit from the sentences of 5 to 8 years imprisonment if convicted of genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes provided they demobilize. The matter is further complicated by the ICC’s capacity to frustrate the ongoing peace negotiations between the government and the FARC guerrillas. These talks aim at ending a conflict disrupting the country for over fifty years.

The issue of sentencing in Colombia illustrates the difficulties the Court faces in applying the principle of complementarity in practice. What are the exact criteria of assessing the state’s willingness to undertake genuine prosecutions? The ICC will evaluate domestic penalties with the reference to two different legal regimes provided by the Rome Statute – admissibility and sentencing. Up until now, the Court has not treated these two issues in conjunction with each other. The post discusses five specific concerns that this exercise may produce. This working paper elaborates on the context surrounding the questions presented below.

  1. Proportionality of sentences

The idea that a penalty must be in proportion to the gravity of the crime is widely accepted in international criminal law. In the Lubanga sentencing decision (para. 36), the ICC held that the ‘gravity of the crime’ is one of the principal factors to be considered in the determination of sentence, which should be in proportion to the offence and reflect the culpability of the convicted person. How will this consideration play out in the complementarity analysis? Will a sentence of 5 to 8 years of imprisonment for crimes against humanity and war crimes be considered grossly disproportionate?

The principle of complementarity presupposes the primacy of states in handling cases domestically. Thus, according to Article 17 of the Rome Statute, a case comes within the purview of the Court only if the crimes are of sufficient gravity and the country in question is unable or unwilling to address them via its national criminal justice system. Article 17(2) specifies that the state is ‘unwilling’ if it initiates the proceedings with an unjustified delay or with the purpose of shielding the person concerned from criminal responsibility or fails to conduct the proceedings independently or impartially – all of which signals lack of intent to bring the person concerned to justice. It is important that the offences allegedly prosecuted and investigated on a national level cover substantially the same conduct as those charged by the ICC, while legal characterization of the underlying incidents matters less.

Consequently, even if domestic prosecutions cover the ‘same conduct’ but result in disproportionately light penalties, this may evidence the state’s intent to shield some persons from responsibility, and, thus, render the case admissible to the ICC. There are three caveats to this argument. First, the ICC’s own sentencing practice so far has been rather lenient: Thomas Lubanga received a sentence of 14 years of imprisonment and Germain Katanga received a sentence of 12 years. The Lubanga analysis of proportionality suggests that no rigid guidelines are available for measuring the correlation between the gravity of the offence and the sentence. The Chamber in its sentencing decision (paras. 92-93) rejected the strict numerical approach suggested by the OTP and upheld its own discretion to assess the totality of factors when deciding on the ultimate number of years of imprisonment. The deficiencies in Mr. Lunbanga’s mens rea and his cooperation with the Court played an important role in the determination of his sentence.

Secondly, in the Al Senussi admissibility decision (paras. 218-219), the ICC dealt with the reverse situation  – the Defence argued that the threat of a death penalty, which the accused faced in Libya, rendered the case admissible because of the adverse effect on the accused. The ICC rejected this plea and granted local authorities a wide margin of appreciation when it comes to punishment, claiming it is not a human rights court. One might expect similar flexibility in cases on the other side of the spectrum.

Finally, Article 53(1)(c) of the Rome Statute allows some room for a manoeuvre granting the prosecution the power not to commence an investigation even where the situation is formally admissible if it serves the ‘interests of justice’. The ‘interests of justice’ is a broad category open to various interpretations, but ultimately it leaves the door open for a political compromise. The fragility of the Colombian peace talks is likely to fall within this category because arguably it provides for a valid reason not to proceed to the official investigations by the ICC.

  1. Participation of the convicted persons in political life

Participation of convicted persons in political life is a burning issue in the peace talks in Colombia. Many senior perpetrators have links to the government or the FARC and hope to remain in power after a deal has been reached. Even if certain leaders from both sides receive formal punishment, the question still remains whether these people will be allowed to form part of a future government. Is it possible to conceive of suspended or lenient sentences as sufficiently reflecting public censure if the convicted person re-enters politics? Can such punishment deter future violations by senior perpetrators?

The Rome Statute does not give any guidance as to whether convicted persons may participate in political life; it restricts the types of punishment to a maximum sentence of 30 years of imprisonment, fine and forfeiture of assets. If one looks at the broader picture, Article 27 renders the official capacity as is generally irrelevant to the ICC prosecutions. This provision is not directly relevant to sentencing, but it reflects the spirit of the Rome Statute. One might argue that for this reason alone the ICC may criticize participation of the convicted person’s in political life.

In its complementarity analysis, the ICC may also refer to the general sentencing practice of the respective state. The Colombian Criminal Code appears rather flexible in this regard; it leaves it up to the judges to decide whether to ban the offender from political life. The law provides for the suspension of rights and public functions as well as the loss of public office as an additional punishment for various offences, such as, murder of certain persons. Loss of public office can last up to 5 years, while suspension of other rights can vary from 5 to 20 years. In certain circumstances, rights can be restored at an earlier date (Articles 43(1), 43(2), 92, 135 of the Colombian Criminal Code).

The ICC is unlikely to be guided solely by the provisions of Colombian law, however. Instead, it is may look at the standards applicable in other states in an attempt to discern generally recognized principles of law deriving from the multitude of domestic legal systems. This is one of the sources of international law along with treaty and custom. It seems that in some jurisdictions there is a blanket prohibition to occupy public posts for those convicted of serious offences. For example, Article 45 of the German Criminal Code reads as follows: ‘Whoever is sentenced for a serious criminal offense to imprisonment for at least one year shall lose for a period of five years the capacity to hold public office and attain public electoral rights.’ This provision reflects an understanding that the public censure element of punishment is severely compromised if someone convicted of a grave offence is allowed to re-enter public life.

  1. Relevance of domestic law for the ICC complementarity analysis

The Rome Statute does not suggest that the ICC should consider the scale of penalties of the relevant state. Its determination of sentences shall solely be guided by the gravity of the crime, individual circumstances of the accused, and mitigating and aggravating factors. It is in contrast to the statutes of the ad hoc tribunals, which allow recourse to domestic law; although, it has rarely been seen in practice.

The ICC will assess Colombian criminal law in its complementarity analysis in the light of the principles enshrined in the Rome Statute and international law. The general principle is that the person cannot invoke domestic law to avoid responsibility under international criminal law. When it comes to the admissibility test, it is essential that the penalty imposed at the national level is not intended to shield the person from criminal responsibility.

  1. Disparity of sentences

The sentencing practice of the Colombian courts shows some disparity in sentences meted out to various parties to the conflict. Colombia attempts to bring to justice different responsible actors, but their penalties are significantly different. How will this aspect play out in the complementarity analysis of the ICC? The question of disparate sentences is tightly linked with the idea of individualized punishments and judicial discretion widely accepted at the ICC. There are a number of factors that might support Colombia’s claim for lenient (and, to a lesser extent, suspended) and/or disparate sentences.

Firstly, it seems that the ICC prosecution already pointed to broad discretion of the Colombian judiciary in its 2012 report (para. 206), when it confirmed that the ICC would examine local sentences individually on the basis of particular factors, such as, the intent to bring perpetrators to justice, the gravity of the crimes and the efforts to establish the truth. Secondly, the ICC practice itself shows relative leniency in its two available sentencing rulings. Thirdly, the reasoning in the Katanga sentencing decision (para. 38) exhibits a trend of integrating reconciliatory aims in sentencing considerations. Fourthly, the Rome Statute upholds the power of the prosecution to halt investigations if it is not in the ‘interests of justice’ in light of the gravity of the crimes and the interests of victims.

  1. Remedy to the victims

When combining two legal frameworks for the purposes of complementarity analysis, the ICC might have to decide where it stands on the issue of enforcement of human rights and victims’ rights. In the recent complementarity decision in the Al Senussi case (paras. 218-219), the ICC refused to act as a human rights court and rendered the case inadmissible, notwithstanding the death penalty threatening the accused. The Court’s view might be altered when victims’ rights are at stake, as is the case in Colombia. Both the Colombian national legislation and the Rome Statute contain provisions upholding victims’ rights in the process of criminal adjudication. Reduced sentences for war crimes and crimes against humanity may be at odds with the victims’ quest for justice. One way to resolve this contradiction is to ensure that victims receive adequate reparations for their suffering. It will not ‘offset’ the perceived impunity of senior perpetrators entirely, but it will help in mitigating the concern.

When the Left Shoots Itself in the Foot (IHL Version)

by Kevin Jon Heller

Last week, I made the mistake of relying on an article in Electronic Intifada about a recent speech by Moshe Ya’alon, the Israeli Defense Minister. Here are the relevant paragraphs in the article:

Israeli defense minister Moshe Yaalon on Tuesday said Israel would attack entire civilian neighborhoods during any future assault on Gaza or Lebanon.

Speaking at a conference in Jerusalem, Yaalon threatened that “we are going to hurt Lebanese civilians to include kids of the family. We went through a very long deep discussion … we did it then, we did it in [the] Gaza Strip, we are going to do it in any round of hostilities in the future.”

I probably should have known better than to rely on an article entitled, in relevant part, “Israeli defense minister promises to kill more civilians.” Prompted by a skeptical commenter, I watched the video of Ya’alon’s speech. And the video makes clear that the author of the article, Asa Winstanley, selectively quoted what Ya’alon said in order to make it seem like Ya’alon was advocating deliberately attacking civilians. In fact, Ya’alon was discussing a possible attack on a rocket launcher located in a civilian house and acknowledging that, if the IDF launched the attack, it was clear they were “going to hurt Lebanese civilians to include kids of the family.” The IDF launched the attack anyway, believing that the military advantage outweighed the certain civilian damage.

Bothered by being suckered into making such a significant mistake, I tweeted Winstanley about his selective quotation. Perhaps he had not actually seen the video? His response was disappointing, to put it mildly. Instead of acknowledging his mistake, he repeated the selective quote. I replied that the video made clear Ya’alon was talking about Israel’s proportionality calculation, not deliberate attacks on civilians, and pointed out that civilian damage is permissible under IHL unless the anticipated civilian damage caused by an attack is excessive in relation to the expected military advantage. I also noted that I thought the attack Ya’alon was discussing was still illegal, because in my view killing a number of civilians in order to take out one rocket launcher was disproportionate.

At that point, it’s safe to say, Winstanley simply lost it. Here are some of his tweets, with my thoughts in the parentheticals…

Regulation 55 and the Irrelevance of the Confirmation Hearing

by Kevin Jon Heller

It’s becoming an old story: the Pre-Trial Chamber (PTC) rejects a charged mode of liability after a confirmation hearing, so the OTP simply asks the Trial Chamber (TC) to give the defendant notice that it will consider convicting him on the basis of the rejected mode anyway. This time, the defendant is Laurent Gbagbo. The OTP initially alleged that Gbagbo is responsible for various crimes against humanity on the basis of Art. 25 in the Rome Statute — indirect co-perpetration; ordering, soliciting or inducing; and otherwise contributing to the commission of crimes — as well as command responsibility and superior responsibility. Following the confirmation hearing, the PTC confirmed all of the modes of liability in Art. 25, but declined to confirm command and superior responsibility, because those modes “would require the Chamber to depart significantly from its understanding of how events unfolded in Cote d’Ivoire during the post-electoral crisis and Laurent Gbagbo’s involvement therein.” Undeterred, the OTP then asked the TC to invoke Regulation 55:

The Office of the Prosecutor (“Prosecution”) requests that Trial Chamber I (“Chamber”) give notice to the Parties and participants pursuant to regulation 55(2) of the Regulations of the Court (“RoC”) that the legal characterisation of the facts confirmed by Pre-Trial Chamber I (“Pre-Trial Chamber”) may be subject to change to accord with a further alternative form of participation of the Accused Laurent Gbagbo (“Gbagbo”): superior responsibility under article 28(a) and (b) of the Rome Statute (“Statute”) for all crimes (“Request”).

I have explained at length in this article why the Rome Statute — Art. 61 in particular — does not permit the Trial Chamber to convict a defendant on the basis of an unconfirmed mode of liability, so there is no need to repeat the argument here. Suffice it to say that the OTP’s request, which will almost certainly be granted by the TC (if past practice is any guide), continues the confirmation hearing’s long, slow slide into irrelevance. Given how the TC and Appeals Chamber have (wrongly) interpreted Regulation 55, the confirmation hearing actually “confirms” nothing; it just provides suggestions to the TC concerning how it might choose to convict the defendant. If the TC wants to go a different direction and convict the defendant on the basis of an unconfirmed mode of participation, no problem. It can simply “recharacterize” the facts and circumstances proven at trial.

Discerning readers might wonder how a defendant is supposed to prepare his defence in such a situation. Isn’t the entire point of the confirmation hearing to inform the defendant of the crimes and modes of liability he will have to rebut during trial? Yes — which is the fundamental problem with Regulation 55 as the judges have interpreted it. Because of their interpretation, defendants now have only two potential strategies at trial: (1) prepare a defence to every possible legal characterization of the facts and circumstances in the charge sheet — all possible crimes and all possible modes of liability; or (2) ignore the law entirely and focus solely on rebutting the facts and circumstances themselves. The first strategy is effectively impossible — and it’s very unlikely the TC would even let a defendant do it. (“Sorry, you have to pick one or two theories of the case — even though we can pick any theory we want down the track.”) And the second strategy is inconsistent with the nature of the adversarial trial contemplated by the Rome Statute. Defendants are (supposed to be) charged with specific crimes on the basis of specific modes of liability; they are not charged with bare facts and circumstances.

It’s a shame that the ICC’s judges have allowed Regulation 55 to metastasise into the ultimate judicial hammer — a one-size-fits-all tool for saving the OTP from its own poor charging decisions and ineffective trial advocacy. (See, e.g., Katanga.) But, of course, it’s not a surprise. After all, the judges wrote the Regulation themselves.