Author Archive for
Jessica Dorsey

Weekly News Wrap: Monday, March 9, 2015

by Jessica Dorsey

Your weekly selection of international law and international relations headlines from around the world:

Africa

Middle East and Northern Africa

Asia

Europe

Americas

Oceania

  • Australia is systematically violating the international Convention Against Torture by detaining children in immigration detention, and holding asylum seekers in dangerous and violent conditions on Manus Island, a United Nations report has found.

UN/World

Events and Announcements: March 8, 2015

by Jessica Dorsey

Events

  • The Conference of the African Association of International Law will take place in Libreville, Gabon from 29 – 31 August 2015. Deadline for submissions of abstracts: 15 March 2015. The African Association of International Law (AAIL) is pleased to announce its 2015 conference entitled: International Economic Law and Development in Africa: Challenges and Opportunities. The working languages of the Conference are English and French. Submissions are welcome in either language. Only one submission per author will be considered. Submissions from women are strongly encouraged. Kindly send an abstract (300 – 500 words) of your paper including your curriculum vitae as well as contact details and institutional affiliation. These materials should be sent to: conference2015 [at] aail-aadi [dot] org before 15 March 2015. Successful applicants will be notified by 31 March 2015. The deadline for submission of final papers is 30 June 2015. Conference fees will be waived for all selected panelists. An award will be given to the author(s) of the best paper of the conference. Selected papers will be published in the African Yearbook of International Law. Should you have any questions about the conference or the call for papers, kindly contact Adejoké Babington-Ashaye, AAIL Director of Programmes at conference2015 [at] aail-aadi [dot] org.
  • The University of Iceland Human Rights Institute and iCourts, the Danish National Research Foundation´s Centre of Excellence for International Courts at Copenhagen University, invite all PhD students to attend a high-level seminar entitled Methods of Human Rights Law Research 26-27 May 2015

Announcements

  • The 4th Munich Advanced Course in International Law (MACIL), organised by the Chair of Public International Law of University of Munich (Germany), will take place in August 2015. The 2015 session is entitled ‘International Law Beyond the State: Towards a New Role for Individuals and other Non-State Actors’. Classes are going to discuss the role of individuals and other non-state actors in international law both from a general international law perspective and with reference to specific case studies. Students of international law, young academics and practitioners of international law or related fields are warmly invited to apply. Deadline for application is 30 April 2015. Further information regarding the programme and the 2015 faculty can be found here.
  • PluriCourts, a Centre for the Study of the Legitimate Roles of the Judiciary in the Global Order in the fields of human rights, trade, investment, international criminal courts and the environment, are offering up to five 3-year postdoctoral fellowships. For more information, click here.

Calls for Papers

  • AJIL Unbound has called for submissions for a Special Issue on Third World Approaches to International Law (TWAIL). Third World Approaches to International Law constitute a distinctive voice in international law. These approaches have emphasized the centrality of colonialism and imperialism to the field. TWAIL has challenged the manner in which first world scholarship monopolized the production of knowledge about international law and, in so doing, has brought to the fore questions of race, culture, power relations, and class. While some TWAIL approaches have critically evaluated the continuities of colonialism and imperialism in post-cold war neo-liberal policies through a variety of lenses including Marxism, others have emphasized international law’s philosophic and theoretical features including its contingency, particularism, and indeterminacy. TWAIL scholars acknowledge that they are engaged in simultaneously critiquing and exposing the limits and the biases, blind spots and unanticipated bad consequences of international law, on the one hand, and embracing possibilities embodied in the guarantees of individual rights and self-determination, on the other. For these and other reasons TWAIL has been criticized for relying on the same underlying assumptions as the system it sought to transcend, for under-emphasizing the continuing marginalization of many women and of indigenous peoples, and for offering no positive agenda for the reform or transformation of international law. AJIL Unbound invites essays of no more than 3000 words reflecting on Third World Approaches to International Law along the foregoing non-exhaustive list of themes. The deadline for submission is April 30, 2015. Submissions should be sent to ajiltwail7 [at] gmail [dot] com.

Our previous events and announcements post can be found here. If you would like to post an announcement on Opinio Juris, please contact us with a one-paragraph description of your announcement along with hyperlinks to more information. 

Weekly News Wrap: Monday, March 2, 2015

by Jessica Dorsey

Your weekly selection of international law and international relations headlines from around the world:

Africa

Middle East and Northern Africa

Asia

Europe

Americas

Oceania

UN/World

Weekly News Wrap: Monday, February 23, 2015

by Jessica Dorsey

Your weekly selection of international law and international relations headlines from around the world:

Africa

Middle East and Northern Africa

  • US-led air strikes against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) group in Syria have killed more than 1,600 people since they began five months ago, according to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights.
  • The UN special envoy to Syria is travelling to Damascus to try to reduce the fighting which has intensified in Aleppo, where rebels claim to have killed 300 government soldiers in the past week.
  • A Moroccan court sentenced a former Spanish soldier to eight years in jail on Friday on charges of leading an Islamist network in the kingdom that was plotting terror attacks, the state news agency MAP said.

Asia

  • North Korea has banned foreign runners from participating in an international marathon scheduled to be held in the capital in April, citing fears about the spread of the deadly Ebola virus, a Beijing-based travel agency said.
  • Nearly three months after police cleared away the last of Hong Kong’s pro-democracy street protests, lingering anger is stoking a new front of radical activism that has turned shopping malls and university campuses into a fresh battleground.

Europe

Americas

  • High-level nuclear negotiations between the United States and Iran resumed in Geneva on Monday as both sides work through technical and political differences to come up with an initial deal by a March 31 deadline.
  • Indonesia has recalled its new ambassador to Brazil after the South American country stopped him taking part in a credentials ceremony following the execution of a Brazilian national for drugs trafficking.

Oceania

UN/World

Events and Announcements: February 22, 2015

by Jessica Dorsey

Events

  • This Friday, February 27, from 12pm to 1pm ET, join the American Society of International Law New Professionals and International Criminal Law Interest Groups for a special online event featuring speakers from the international courts and tribunals in The Hague and other organizations engaged in international criminal law.  “Getting Started in International Criminal Law” is part of the ASIL New Professionals Interest Group’s “Getting Started” series. The webinar will be broadcast live through the ASIL website. Speakers will include staff from the Office of the Prosecutor of the Special Tribunal for Lebanon and the International Criminal Court, legal officers from the chambers of judges on the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, and defense counsel from the Special Tribunal for Lebanon, as well as academic and non-governmental practitioners working in the field.  The event will be moderated by Professor Beth van Schaack of Santa Clara Law School. Viewers can stream the event on their personal computers and submit questions during the livestream by emailing events [at] asil [dot] org.  For more information and to register, go here.

Announcements

  • The Academy on Human Rights and Humanitarian Law is pleased to announce that the Program of Advanced Studies on Human Rights and Humanitarian Law is now accepting applicationsThe program will take place from May 26 to June 12, 2015. This Program offers 18 courses in English and Spanish lectured by over 40 scholars of relevance in the field of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law and gathers more than 150 participants from more than 25 different countries and with different levels of professional experience. The Academy on Human Rights and Humanitarian Law provides through this Program the unique opportunity to learn and interact with judges of the International Criminal Court (ICC), the International Court of Justice (ICJ), Special Rapporteurs of United Nations, members of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights and professors from all over the world. The Program is offered in three categories which include the modality of Certificate of Attendance for lawyers, law students and HR professionals of any country, ABA Credits for U.S. students and finally, the Diploma Course that is offered to a select group of 35 law professionals who fulfill the admission requirements. You can review the brochure here and the application form for this program will be available here. For more information, please contact: hracademy [at] wcl [dot] american [dot] edu.

Our previous events and announcements post can be found here. If you would like to post an announcement on Opinio Juris, please contact us with a one-paragraph description of your announcement along with hyperlinks to more information. 

Weekly News Wrap: Monday, February 16, 2015

by Jessica Dorsey

Your weekly selection of international law and international relations headlines from around the world:

Africa

Middle East and Northern Africa

Asia

Europe

  • A suspected gunman in two shootings on Saturday and Sunday in Copenhagen, in which two were killed and several injured, has been killed by police; the first shooting occurred at a freedom of speech event with Swedish cartoonist Lars Vilks, and second happened outside a synagogue in the city.
  • After the deadly shooting at a Denmark synagogue, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said on Sunday such attacks will likely continue and Israel would welcome European Jews who choose to move there.
  • The Italian coast guard has rescued more than 2,100 migrants in a major rescue operation in the sea between Europe and North Africa.
  • Italy closed its embassy in Libya on Sunday and stepped up its call for a U.N. mission to calm the worsening conflict there as thousands of migrants approached Italy by boat from North Africa.
  • Ukraine’s rebels disavowed a new truce on Sunday hours after it took effect, saying it did not apply to the town where most fighting has taken place in recent weeks.
  • Greece and its international creditors started talks on Friday on reforms needed to keep the country financed, increasing the possibility of a interim compromise deal between the euro zone and Athens at a ministerial meeting on Monday.

Americas

Oceania

UN/World

Events and Announcements: February 15, 2015

by Jessica Dorsey

Events

  • Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law announces: “Liberty and Security Today: A New Normal?” a panel discussion taking place Thursday, Feb 26, 2015 from 7pm – 8:30pm at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law. Given renewed fears of terrorism driven by the rise of ISIS and their skilled use of social media, how is the continuing conflict over security and liberty evolving? What can we expect in the future as the renewal of the Patriot Act looms and debate over authorizations for the use of force and surveillance come to the floor of Congress? Is there a new normal? And if so, what does it mean for civil liberties and for the safety and security of Americans? Panelists include our own Deborah Pearlstein, Associate Professor of Law, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law; Jameel Jaffer, Deputy Legal Director, ACLU; and Scott Shane, New York Times. The discussion will be moderated by Karen J. Greenberg, Director, Center on National Security at Fordham Law School. Please RSVP to sutjipto [at] yu [dot] edu.
  • The Holocaust, Genocide and Human Rights Program at Cardozo School of Law, Jacob Burns Foundation, Rutgers School of Law-Newark, and the Law & Humanities Institute invite you to: The Abolition of War, from February 20-21, 2015. Why has war never become a taboo? This topic and others connected to the experience of war will be explored at a two-day symposium at Cardozo School of Law and Rutgers School of Law.

Announcements

  • The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) has now made the preparatory documents to the Geneva Conventions available digitally.
  • The ICRC has also published its latest quarterly bibliography, which lists references to English and French publications on international humanitarian law. The bibliography is based on books and other material in the ICRC library.
  • The University of Geneva has announced its summer school program in international humanitarian law, taking place from June 22 to July 10, 2015. The course methodology insists on the importance of a practice-based teaching of International Humanitarian Law (IHL), the law protecting persons affected by armed conflicts, thus combining theory and discussions of contemporary conflicts.The course welcomes applications from graduate or post-graduate students (currently enrolled in master degree or above) in law, international relations or related areas, Ph.D candidates, and humanitarian practitioners. Upper-year undergraduate students may also apply, and will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Please note that this is a master-level course. Background in public international law is recommended, although not required.More information, including the program flyer, information about courses and faculty can be found on the website here.
  • The Kalliopi Koufa Foundation on the Promotion of International Law and Human Rights organizes the inaugural session of the Thessaloniki Summer Courses on International Law and Human Rights from 1 to 10 July 2015 in Thessaloniki, Greece, on the topic of “International Aspects and Issues of Energy Law”. The Thessaloniki Summer Courses are open to students, especially LLM students and PhD candidates, researchers and practitioners from all over the world. The registration deadlines are 1 March 2015 (early bird reduced fee) and 1 May 2015 (late application). For all other information concerning the provisional programme, please visit the website here, or contact the organizers at summercourses [at] koufafoundation [dot] org.
  • The Research Group “The International Rule of Law – Rise or Decline?“ invites applications for three 12-24 months Fellowships in International Law or International Relations from 1 October 2015. The Group (Krieger, Nolte, Zimmermann (IL), Jachtenfuchs, Liese, Zürn (IR)) examines the role of international law in a changing global order. Developments in recent years give rise to the question whether the move towards an international rule of law, which seems to continue in some areas, has lost momentum in others. The Research Group addresses these questions from a legal and a political science perspective. The working language of the group is English. Fellows will work at Humboldt University Berlin. A monthly stipend of EUR 2500,00 plus one roundtrip is attached to the position from which all costs will have to be covered. The Fellowships are designed for applicants worldwide with a doctorate in international law or in international relations. The proposed projects should relate to the Group’s area of research. Applicants must have completed their PhD by 31 August 2015 and should not have pursued more than 3 years of postdoctoral research. Candidates from outside Europe are particularly encouraged to apply. Applicants should submit, apart from their CV and a list of publications, a description of current research and of a project to be pursued du-ring the first year of the Fellowship (no more than 1000 words), a summary of the candidate’s doctoral thesis, and two letters of recommendation. The deadline for application is 31 March 2015. Please send your application in PDF format to intlaw [at] rewi [dot] hu-berlin [dot] de.

Our previous events and announcements post can be found here. If you would like to post an announcement on Opinio Juris, please contact us with a one-paragraph description of your announcement along with hyperlinks to more information. 

Weekly News Wrap: Monday, February 9, 2015

by Jessica Dorsey

Your weekly selection of international law and international relations headlines from around the world:

Africa

Middle East and Northern Africa

Asia

Europe

Americas

  • CACI International, a US defence contractor which supplied interrogators accused of involvement in the abuse and torture of detainees at Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq, has sought to have a lawsuit against it dismissed, stating its employees were working under military control during a time of war.
  • Somalia’s prime minister on Sunday appealed to the US government and US banks to resume allowing money transfers to Somalia, a crucial service for many in the war-torn country.

Oceania

UN/World

Events and Announcements: February 8, 2015

by Jessica Dorsey

Events

  • The Centre for International Law of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel has the pleasure of inviting you to a one-day conference: “The South China Sea: An International Law Perspective” on Friday, 6 March 2015 in Brussels, Belgium. Showcasing panels of renowned law of the sea experts, the conference will offer presentations and Q&A sessions centered on the themes of fisheries, navigation, islands and international dispute settlement. Attendance is free, but registration is required, on a first come, first serve basis, by Sunday, 1 March 2015. A walking lunch, coffee breaks and a closing reception will be provided. Please register here. The conference programme may be consulted here.
  • The International Institute of Humanitarian Law, in cooperation with the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies and the International Disaster Law Project and with the support of the Italian Red Cross, will conduct the 2nd International Disaster Law Course from 27 April to 1 May, in Sanremo, Italy. More information can be found here.
  • The 5th Annual “Live from L,” presented by  the Office of the Legal Adviser, U.S. Department of State is taking place this Thursday, February 12th, 2015 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM US Eastern Standard Time. This year’s theme is: “The Role of the Law in the Fight Against ISIL: Use of Force, Sanctions, and Foreign Terrorist Fighters.” The Section of International Law is pleased to announce the fifth annual non-CLE webcast with the Office of the Legal Adviser from the Jacob Burns Moot Courtroom of the George Washington University Law School in Washington, D.C. Cosponsored by the American Society of International Law, the George Washington University Law School, and the Women’s Bar Association of DC International Law Forum Speakers: Mary E. McLeod Acting Legal Adviser, U.S. Department of State Joshua L. Dorosin Assistant Legal Adviser, Office of Political-Military Affairs David M. DeBartolo Attorney Adviser, Office of United Nations Affairs Michael J. Gilles Attorney Adviser, Office of Economic and Business Affairs Samuel W. McDonald Attorney Adviser, Office of Law Enforcement and Intelligence Moderator: Susan L. Karamanian Associate Dean for International and Comparative Legal Studies, George Washington University Law School   Attend the program in person at George Washington University Law School or from the convenience of your desk by webcast or by teleconference. Time permitting, the audience will be given the opportunity to ask questions; those who participate by conference call or by webcast will be provided an email address for questions. Registration: Register to attend in person for FREE Register for the webcast for FREE Register for the teleconference for $15 Click here to register now

Call for Papers

  • Time is an inherent component of many of the most important international law concepts. However, it also fundamentally determines international law as a field. International law has been in constant dynamic change since its inception. Capturing and understanding this change in time is one of the discipline’s fundamental challenges, as is the difficulty of working with the constantly changing materiae of international law in practice. The Graduate Institute Geneva’s International Law Department is opening a call for papers to create an opportunity to reflect and debate about the fundamentals of international law in depth. The conference is open to both junior and senior international law scholars and practitioners. The deadline for abstract submissions is February 15, 2015. The Conference will be held at the Graduate Institute’s Barton site.
  • The second workshop on Sociological Inquiries into International Law will take place at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs on 9-10 October 2015. Scholars and graduate students are invited to submit abstracts by 1 April 2015. For full details, including information about application processes, please see the call for papers.

Announcements

  • Hart Publishing is delighted to announce that the 2nd  issue of the Journal on the Use of Force and International Law (JUFIL) is now available online. The contents include an Introduction by James A Green, Christian Henderson and Tom Ruys; An Editorial Comment on The Use of Force and Islamic State by Christian Henderson; Articles include: The Contemporary Discourse on the Use of Force in the Nineteenth Century: A Diachronic and Critical Analysis by Agatha Verdebout; The Lawfulness of a Use of Force upon Nuclear Facilities in Self-Defence by Arman Sarvarian; Remote Law-Making? American Drone Strikes and the Development of Jus Ad Bellum by Marie Aronsson; Extraterritorial Kidnapping and the Rules on Interstate Force by Helen McDermott; The Digest of State Practice covers the period: 1 January–30 June 2014. Please click here to read the abstracts.

Our previous events and announcements post can be found here. If you would like to post an announcement on Opinio Juris, please contact us with a one-paragraph description of your announcement along with hyperlinks to more information. 

Weekly News Wrap: Monday, February 2, 2015

by Jessica Dorsey

Your weekly selection of international law and international relations headlines from around the world:

Africa

  • Malian rebels fought pro-government militia in the northern village of Kano overnight, three security sources said, firing rockets and briefly kidnapping at least 20 people in the latest spike of violence between armed groups.
  • Chadian forces have killed 120 militants from Boko Haram in a battle in the north of neighbouring Cameroon that began when the insurgents attacked its troops, the army said in a statement on Saturday, adding that three of its soldiers were killed.
  • Nigerians who fled from Boko Haram fighters have now become a headache for Chadian authorities after seeking safety across the border.
  • Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe has dismissed concerns that his appointment as new African Union chairman would harm relations between the pan-African bloc and the West.
  • Suspected Boko Haram fighters have launched an offensive against the key Nigerian city of Maiduguri, the largest city in Borno State, witnesses said.

Middle East and Northern Africa

  • At least 10 people have been killed in Yemen over the past four days in attacks led by an al Qaeda’s affiliate against Shi’ite Houthi fighters and the Yemeni army, local officials and the group said.
  • Jordan has vowed to do all it can to save the life of a pilot held by the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) after the group released a video purportedly showing the killing of Japanese journalist Kenji Goto.
  • A suspected U.S. drone strike on a car in Yemen killed three men believed to be al Qaeda militants on Saturday and possibly another drone crashed in a different part of the country, residents said.
  • The United States and its allies carried out 27 air strikes against Islamic State militants in Iraq and Syria since early Friday, the Combined Joint Task Force leading the operation reported on Saturday.

Asia

Europe

  • Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras has struck a conciliatory note hours before Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis was due to seek support for a renegotiation of the country’s $270bn bailout in Paris.
  • Artillery attacks on the Ukrainian city of Donetsk killed at least one civilian on Monday while Kiev’s military reported that five more Ukrainian soldiers had been killed in clashes with separatists in the east in the past 24 hours.
  • The Appeals Chamber of the ICTY on Friday upheld genocide convictions [PDF] for Vujadin Popovic and Ljubisa Beara for crimes perpetrated by Bosnian Serb forces during the 1995 Srebrenica massacre.

Americas

Oceania

  • Two Australian citizens are next in line to be executed for drug offences in Indonesia, the Southeast Asian nation’s attorney general said on Monday, in a move likely to strain ties between the neighbors. .

UN/World

Weekend Roundup: January 24-31, 2015

by Jessica Dorsey

This week on Opinio Juris saw Deborah note the publication of current Guantanamo detainee Mohammedou Slahi’s diary and her review that appeared in the Washington Post about it. Peter offered further commentary on his first post on John Boehner’s invitation to Benjamin Netanyahu to address the US Congress, specifically in terms of what the invitation says about constitutional change.

Though he never met him in person, Julian noted the passing of Dr. Luke T. Lee, and paid homage to him and his treatise on Consular Law and Practice.

In light of the hostage situation between ISIS and Jordan/Japan, Jens weighed in on hostages and human dignity. Jens also reported on yesterday’s decision at the ICTY Appeals Chamber, upholding genocide charges in the case of The Prosecutor v. Popovic et al. related to the massacre at Srebrenica in July, 1995.

Duncan highlighted his newest paper, this time he’s written An Intersubjective Treaty Power and a guest post came in from Nimrod Karin, responding to Kevin’s critique of his Just Security posts (here and here), about whether Palestine’s joining the ICC amounted to “lawfare.”

And finally, I updated you on the weekly news and also offered the events and announcements post.

Many thanks to our guest contributor and have a nice weekend!

Weekly News Wrap: Monday, January 26, 2015

by Jessica Dorsey

Your weekly selection of international law and international relations headlines from around the world:

Africa

  • Top Ugandan rebel commander Dominic Ongwen is due to make his first appearance at the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague today to face war crimes charges.
  • United Nations experts warned that Sudan’s remote western territories could become a breeding ground for radical Islamists as violence in the country’s conflict-torn Darfur region rages at an alarming level.
  • Boko Haram has launched a major offensive in Nigeria’s northeastern city of Maiduguri and the town of Monguno, engaging in fierce battles with the military.

Middle East and Northern Africa

Asia

Europe

Americas

Oceania

  • Conservative Prime Minister Tony Abbott has awarded Australia’s highest honor to Prince Philip, husband of Queen Elizabeth, sparking a barrage of criticism across the country on its national day of celebration. The award grated with republicans who want to sever ties with Britain and appoint an Australian president.
  • Australia called on Indonesia on Friday to reconsider its decision to execute two Australians convicted of drug offences, a move that is likely to strain already fragile ties between the two neighbors.
  • The United States has agreed that Australian David Hicks, jailed on terrorism charges for five years at Guantanamo, is innocent, his lawyer said on Friday.

UN/World

  • A new round of U.N. talks between rival Libyan factions will take place in Geneva on Monday, the United Nations said, even as gunmen kidnapped the deputy foreign minister of the recognised government.
  • The World Health Organisation (WHO) has admitted that the Ebola outbreak in West Africa revealed “inadequacies and shortcomings” in how it responds to crises.