Author Archive for
Jessica Dorsey

Weekly News Wrap: Monday, November 24, 2014

by Jessica Dorsey

Your weekly selection of international law and international relations headlines from around the world:

Africa

Middle East and Northern Africa

Asia

Europe

  • Britain is facing the biggest terrorism threat in its history and has foiled around 40 major plots since suicide bombers attacked London in 2005, Home Secretary Theresa May said on Monday.
  • Lower oil prices and Western financial sanctions imposed over the Ukraine crisis will cost Russia around $130-140 billion a year – equivalent to around 7 percent of its economy – Finance Minister Anton Siluanov said on Monday.
  • The United States will keep troops in Poland and the Baltic states for at least the next year as tensions with Russia remain, the commander of U.S. land forces in Europe said on Sunday.
  • A week-long operation to clear the wreckage from the crash site of Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 in Ukraine has been completed, according to the Dutch government.
  • The number of Germans fighting alongside Islamic State militants in Syria and Iraq has increased sharply to 550 and around 180 have returned, the head of Germany’s domestic intelligence said in a newspaper interview published on Sunday.

Americas

UN/World

Mini-Symposium: James Stewart’s The Turn to Corporate Criminal Liability for International Crimes–Transcending the Alien Tort Statute

by Jessica Dorsey

This week we will host a mini-symposium on James G. Stewart’s latest article, The Turn to Corporate Criminal Liability for International Crimes: Transcending the Alien Tort Statute. James has been an Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Law at Allard Hall, University of British Columbia, where he as been since 2009. Previously he was an Associate-in-Law at Columbia Law School in New York. He has also been an Appeals Counsel with the Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and has also worked for the Legal Division of the International Committee of the Red Cross and the Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. James primarily works on the relationship between atrocity, commerce, and international criminal justice and has published extensively on these subjects.

Between today and Wednesday, Samuel Moyn (Harvard University), Steven Ratner (University of Michigan) and Beth Stephens (Rutgers) will comment on the article article and the author will respond.

It is our pleasure to welcome these scholars to Opinio Juris this week and we look forward to thoughtful comments and questions from our readership as well.

Events and Announcements: November 23, 2014

by Jessica Dorsey

Events

  • italyspractice.info is a website aimed at collecting, categorising and translating into English the practice of the Italian government on issues of international law. Only five months after its appearance, it has registered approximately 7,000 views from all over the world and gathered more than 560 followers. The authors of italyspractice.info firmly believe in this project and their purpose is to develop it further. Thus, they are now organising a conference that will take place in Trento on 27 November 2014, to make their work known, discuss some of its preliminary outcomes and announce its planned expansion. The main goal is twofold: on the one side, to give an account of recent Italian practice on international law by illustrating and commenting upon a number of cases related to Italy’s foreign policy; on the other – and most importantly – to place this practice in the wider context of the role and nature of custom, situating the website in the framework of the ongoing theoretical debate with the help of three well-known experts of customary law and other international guest speakers. The flyer with the full programme of the conference may be downloaded here (.pdf).

Calls for papers

  • Despite the deep infiltrations of international law in the material world around us,
    the relationship between international law and physical objects has not preoccupied international lawyers or international law scholars. By considering international law through a new lens – that of its objects, symbols and images – this project will provide a new way of thinking about international law in terms of its material and visual culture, interrogating the relationship between material objects and objects as purposes.  We invite you to select one image or object, which in your view best represents your area of expertise in international law, or international law as a whole, and to write about its significance in international law.  For more information, please see the call for papers.
  • The 4th annual conference of the Cambridge Journal of International and Comparative Law (CJICL) will be held at the University of Cambridge on 8 and 9 May 2015. The conference theme is Developing Democracy: Conversations on Democratic Governance in International, European and Comparative Law. Conference highlights include a keynote address by Dame Rosalyn Higgins, DBE, QC, former President of the International Court of Justice. More information can be found here.

Last week’s events and announcements can be found here. If you would like to post an announcement on Opinio Juris, please contact us with a one-paragraph description of your announcement along with hyperlinks to more information. 

Weekend Roundup: November 16-22, 2014

by Jessica Dorsey

Over the past week on Opinio Juris, we again enjoyed a lot of different perspectives from our guest bloggers, beginning with Rob Howse, whom Kristen introduced as this week’s featured guest blogger. He highlighted the return of neo-conservativism in Washington, reminded us of Alexandre Kojève’s being a neglected figure in the history of international law and also discussed the breakthrough at recent WTO talks and the trade facilitation agreement this week. He also posted on Liam Murphy’s book What Makes International Law Law?

Additionally, we heard from S. I. Strong announcing that the preliminary results from a recent empirical study on international commercial mediation and conciliation are now available.

Nicolás Carrillo-Santarelli talked about the most recent events in Colombia with the negotiations between the government and FARC rebels being suspended due to the and the kidnapping under IHL, including discussion around the illegality of deprivations of liberty, which sparked quite an intellectual debate in the comments.

A post also came in from Andrea Pin on the Italian Constitutional Court, the International Court of Justice and German war crimes. Duncan French and Jean d’Aspremont co-blogged on the ILC project on the identification of customary international law in summary of the two-day expert level seminar hosted by Lincoln Law School and the Manchester International Law Center.

Roger wrote up his analysis on the Ninth Circuit’s muddled comity analysis in Mujica v. Airscan while Kevin worked out some of his thoughts on the baffling Comoros decision and introduced a new videogame challenging the player to survive as long as possible as a civilian in a war-torn fictional city. Additionally, he introduced and congratulated the newly minted Dr. Mark Kersten.

Finally, I wrapped up the news and listed events and announcements.

Many thanks to our guest contributors and have a nice weekend!

Weekly News Wrap: Monday, November 17, 2014

by Jessica Dorsey

Your weekly selection of international law and international relations headlines from around the world:

Africa

Middle East and Northern Africa

Asia

  • Thousands of Rohingya boat people who have left Myanmar in the past month have yet to reach their destinations, say relatives and an advocacy group for the persecuted minority, raising fears their boats have been prevented from reaching shore.
  • Three Hong Kong student leaders were stopped from boarding a flight to Beijing on Saturday to take their fight for greater democracy directly to the Chinese government after airline authorities said their travel permits were invalid.
  • North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is to send a personal envoy to Russia, state media said on Friday, the latest in a series of diplomatic moves by the isolated country as it fends off accusations of crimes against humanity.

Europe

Americas

Oceania

  • Australian city Brisbane played host to the G20 meeting, where leaders have pledged to stimulate job growth, bolster global financial institutions and address climate change in the communique released at the end of a two-day summit in Brisbane.

UN/World

  • Fighters from the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) are committing war crimes and crimes against humanity on a large scale in areas under the group’s control in Syria, UN investigators say. In its first report focused squarely on acts by ISIL, the UN Commission of Inquiry on Syria presented on Friday a horrifying picture of what life was like in areas controlled by the group, including massacres, beheadings, torture, sexual enslavement and forced pregnancy.

Events and Announcements: November 16, 2014

by Jessica Dorsey

Events

  • ASIL-IEcLIG Co-Chairs, Elizabeth Trujillo (Suffolk University Law School) and Jason Yackee (University of Wisconsin Law School), are happy to announce the upcoming ASIL–International Economic Law Interest Group’s Biennial Research conference, on “Reassessing International Economic Law and Development: New Challenges for Law and Policy,” taking place on November 13-15, 2014. It is hosted by ASIL Academic Partner University of Denver Sturm College of Law, in collaboration with the Sutton Colloquium. The keynote speaker is Petros Mavroidis of ASIL Academic Partner Columbia University School of Law and the European University Institute. More than 60 leading scholars from five regions of the world will gather to present their academic work on the conference theme and other important topics in international economic law. Panels will address the role of law in devising domestic strategies for development; regulating climate change and fostering clean energy programs; addressing food security and technology transfer; and promoting international financial stability. More information can be found on the website here.

Call for papers

  • The London International Boundary Conference 2015 will take place on 21-22 April 2015 at the Royal Geographical Society in London. The organizers have launched a call for papers.This conference will provide a unique and multidisciplinary insight into the complex world of international boundary and territorial questions.  Each panel will offer a balance of established expertise and emerging talent. The Department of Geography, King’s College London, Volterra Fietta and the United Kingdom Hydrographic Office invite any interested parties to submit their abstract to Clementine Lietar (clementine [dot] lietar [at] volterrafietta [dot] com) and Anass El Mouden (anass [dot] elmouden [at] volterrafietta [dot] com) by 31 December 2014. This abstract should be written in English and contain no more than 500 words. It should include the title of the paper as well as the name and contact details of the author. More information about the call and the conference can be found on the website.
  • The Stanford Program in Law and Society at Stanford Law School is pleased to announce its Second Conference for Junior Researchers. Following the success of last year’s Inaugural Conference, this event seeks to continue the community-building process by providing a forum where aspiring scholars from around the globe can meet to present and discuss their current projects on law and society and create a fruitful ground for future cooperation. The conference is specially designed for junior researchers to present their work in progress and receive input from faculty and other participants, while promoting vibrant discussions and the exchange of ideas. The conference will also allow participants to develop their research skills through a special workshop. The conference invites papers from junior researchers (graduate students, post-graduate students, post-doctoral researchers as well as recent graduates from law schools and social science departments) that explore the relationship between law and social transformations. More information can be found here. Junior researchers are invited to submit an abstract of up to 400 words, together with their CV. All abstracts and CVs should be submitted to stanfordlawandsociety [at] gmail [dot] com by January 12, 2015.
  • The Polish Yearbook of International Law (PYIL) is currently seeking articles for its next volume (XXXIV), which will be published in June 2015. Authors are invited to submit complete unpublished papers in areas connected with public and private international law, including European law. Although it is not a formal condition for acceptance, we are specifically interested in articles that address issues in international and European law relating to Central and Eastern Europe. In this context, we are particularly looking for articles that analyse different legal aspects of the current Ukrainian crisis and the new power relations that are emerging in this part of the world. Authors from the region are also strongly encouraged to submit their works. Submissions should not exceed 15,000 words (including footnotes) but in exceptional cases we may also accept longer works. We assess manuscripts on a rolling basis and will consider requests for expedited review in case of a pending acceptance for publication from another journal. All details about submission procedure and required formatting are available on PYIL’s webpage. Please send manuscripts to pyil [at] inp [dot] pan [dot] pl. The deadline for submissions is 31 January 2015.

Announcements

  • TheCentre of Excellence for International Courts (iCourts) welcomes scholarship applications oriented at the study of international courts and dispute resolution with an empirical and interdisciplinary focus. In particular, candidates interested in the institutionalization of global courts, such as the ICC, ICJ, WTO AB and the ITLOS; in international commercial arbitration; and in the justificatory practices of international courts in philosophical context are encouraged to apply. Contact: Associate Professor, Joanna Jemielniak, joanna [dot] jemielniak [at] jur [dot] ku [dot] dk. You can read more about the scholarships on the website.

Last week’s events and announcements can be found here. If you would like to post an announcement on Opinio Juris, please contact us with a one-paragraph description of your announcement along with hyperlinks to more information. 

Weekend Roundup: November 8-15, 2014

by Jessica Dorsey

This week on Opinio Juris, we had three guest contributions in addition to some of our regular bloggers weighing in on timely issues in international law. The first guest post, from Michael Kearney, discussed his thoughts on the ICC’s recent decision regarding the Mavi Marmara report, in which he focused on issues about fact-finding missions, categorization of armed conflict, limitations on territorial jurisdiction, and humanitarian assistance.

Jean d’Aspremont weighed in on an event that was organized by Manchester International Law Center and the Lincoln Law School, and shared his thoughts about the identification of customary international law and the ILC report. Another post is expected from Jean later this week or beginning of next.

Additionally, Gabor Rona contributed to a discussion about the United States’ AUMF with respect to the Islamic State, that had its origins on Lawfare and Just Security earlier in the week, specifically about use of force provisions against “associated forces” and why the government should go with Just Security’s “parties to the conflict” interpretation versus Lawfare’s proposal of “engaged in hostilities”.

From our regular contributors, we saw Peter’s analysis of Kuwait’s decision to bulk-order Comoros citizenship (to the tune of a couple hundred million dollars) for stateless native-born tribal Bidoon, thereby purporting to solve the statelessness problem in Kuwait and Roger discussed his contribution to a Notre Dame Law Review symposium on Bond v. United States, in which he presented on the relationship between Supreme Court treaty interpretation and the international approach to treaty interpretation under the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties.

Kristin called attention to the election of two new ICJ judges and Kevin also announced a UNWCC event at SOAS London coming up on the 19th.

Finally, I wrapped up the news and An listed events and announcements.

Many thanks to our guest contributors and have a nice weekend!

Weekly News Wrap: Monday, November 10, 2014

by Jessica Dorsey

Your weekly selection of international law and international relations headlines from around the world:

Africa

  • A suicide bomber dressed as a student killed at least 48 people, most of them students, and injured 79 others at a school assembly in the northeastern Nigerian town of Potiskum on Monday, a hospital official said.
  • Opposition parties, civil society groups and religious leaders adopted a plan on Sunday for a transitional authority to guide Burkina Faso to elections, after a popular uprising forced longtime president Blaise Compaore from power.

Middle East and Northern Africa

Asia

Europe

Americas

Oceania

UN/World

Weekly News Wrap: Monday, November 3, 2014

by Jessica Dorsey

Your weekly selection of international law and international relations headlines from around the world:

Africa

Middle East and Northern Africa

Asia

Europe

Americas

Oceania

UN/World

Events and Announcements: November 1, 2014

by Jessica Dorsey

Events

  • Junior Scholar Workshop – Law and Human Rights in the Global South: the Role of the State and the Non-State, UBC Law School, June 8-10, 2015. At this point in history it is trite to suggest that the evolving role of non-state actors is transforming the landscape of human rights law. Yet despite repeated calls to incorporate the reality of non-state actor law-making in our accounts of human rights law, scholars are still struggling to incorporate this empirical insight in the emerging literature of law and human rights. How can human rights law be further enriched by a nuanced understanding of the ways in which non-state actors are both protecting human rights and preventing the realization of these rights? And what is the role of the state in protecting human rights in an era where security, immigration control and global trade appear to dominate state political agendas? This Workshop invites submissions on all these themes, including papers addressing the scope, impact and future of human rights as they apply to the corporate world. For full details, including information about application processes, please see the official flier here.

Announcements

  • The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) has recently launched the online version of the casebook, How does law protect in WarThis new online reference platform in IHL features:
    • Regular updates with new case studies on contemporary armed conflicts
    • An comprehensive IHL outline composed of 14 different themes
    • More than 350 case studies covering past and contemporary armed conflicts
    • More than 20 model IHL courses and pedagogical resources for IHL lecturers
    • More than 300 terms and notions referenced in the online index “A to Z”
    • Full online navigation between theory and practice through internal links and search engine
  • The ICRC has also published its IHL Bibliography, 2014-3.
  • The Francis Lieber Prize is awarded annually by the American Society of International Law’s Lieber Society on the Law of Armed Conflict to the authors of publications which the judges consider to be outstanding in the field of law and armed conflict. Both monographs and articles (including chapters in books of essays) are eligible for consideration, as the prize is awarded to the best submission in each of these two categories. More information can be found here. The deadline for submissions is 9 January 2015.

Last week’s events and announcements can be found here. If you would like to post an announcement on Opinio Juris, please contact us with a one-paragraph description of your announcement along with hyperlinks to more information.

Weekly News Wrap: Monday, October 27, 2014

by Jessica Dorsey

Your weekly selection of international law and international relations headlines from around the world:

Africa

Middle East and Northern Africa

Asia

Europe

Americas

Oceania

  • A group of asylum seekers in Australia who took the immigration department to court over the exposure of their personal details in a major data breach have won a federal court appeal, and the immigration minister has been ordered to pay their costs.

UN/World

Weekly News Wrap: Monday, October 20, 2014

by Jessica Dorsey

Your weekly selection of international law and international relations headlines from around the world:

Africa

Middle East and Northern Africa

Asia

Europe

Americas

Oceania

  • Australian police have agreed to assist China in the extradition and seizure of assets of corrupt Chinese officials who have fled with hundreds of millions of dollars in illicit funds, the Sydney Morning Herald newspaper reported on Monday.

UN/World