Author: Jennifer Trahan

[Jennifer Trahan is Clinical Professor at NYU's Center for Global Affairs and Director of their Concentration in International Law & Human Rights.] On September 27, 2021, the new International Criminal Court (“ICC”) Prosecutor, Karim Khan, announced that the Office of the Prosecutor was seeking authorization to resume investigation in the ICC’s Afghanistan situation.  He also announced that his office would focus the Afghanistan...

Jennifer Trahan is Clinical Professor at NYU's Center for Global Affairs and Director of their Concentration in International Law & Human Rights. A reset of US policy toward the International Criminal Court (ICC) is sorely needed. It is also time for the US, which historically has been a leader in the field of international justice, to reassume that leadership mantle. Rescind Sanctions...

[Jennifer Trahan is Clinical Professor and Director of the Concentration in International Law and Human Rights at the NYU Center for Global Affairs and author of Existing Legal Limits to Security Council Veto Power in the Face of Atrocity Crimes (CUP 2020), winner of the “2020 ABILA Book of the Year Award” by the American Branch of the International Law Association.] This is...

[Jennifer Trahan is Clinical Professor and Director of the Concentration in International Law and Human Rights at the NYU Center for Global Affairs and author of Existing Legal Limits to Security Council Veto Power in the Face of Atrocity Crimes (CUP 2020), winner of the “2020 ABILA Book of the Year Award” by the American Branch of the International Law Association.] I am...

[Jennifer Trahan is Clinical Professor and Director of the Concentration in International Law and Human Rights at the NYU Center for Global Affairs and author of Existing Legal Limits to Security Council Veto Power in the Face of Atrocity Crimes (CUP 2020), winner of the “2020 ABILA Book of the Year Award” by the American Branch of the International Law Association.] It is no secret...

[Jennifer Trahan is a Professor at the NYU Center for Global Affairs.] While hostility by the current administration against the International Criminal Court (“ICC”) commenced already a few years ago, the opening of the Afghanistan investigation this past spring has reignited it.  Yet, a showdown between the US and ICC—particularly ill-timed during the COVID crisis—benefits neither.  The US should refrain from...

[Jennifer Trahan is a Professor at the NYU Center for Global Affairs.] On March 5, 2020, the International Criminal Court’s Appeals Chamber issued an extremely significant ruling authorizing the opening of the Afghanistan investigation.  The decision is important in that it confirms the Prosecutor’s discretion in evaluating whether or not to proceed “in the interests of justice” under Article 53(1)(c) of the Rome Statute, thereby allowing the Afghanistan...

[Jennifer Trahan is a Clinical Professor at the NYU Center for Global Affairs.] John Heieck is asking the right questions in his new book, A Duty to Prevent Genocide: Due Diligence Obligations Among the P5. Namely, how does one reconcile hard law legal obligations regarding the duty to “prevent” genocide with the inaction seen out of the UN Security Council as well as...

[Jennifer Trahan is a Clinical Professor at the NYU Center for Global Affairs.] Monday, at the Federalist Society, National Security Adviser John Bolton delivered a major foreign policy address, devoted almost entirely to attacking the International Criminal Court, a court established to prosecute the most egregious crimes of concern to the international community. At a time when the US does indeed face many...

[Jennifer Trahan is a Clinical Professor at the NYU Center for Global Affairs.] July 17, International Justice Day, not only marked the 20th anniversary of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (“ICC”), but also activation of the ICC’s fourth crime, the crime of aggression. These milestones were celebrated by an event at the UN entitled “20th anniversary of the Rome Statute:...

[Jennifer Trahan is an Associate Clinical Professor at the NYU Center for Global Affairs.] I, too, would like to thank Opinio Juris for our mini-symposium and dialogue on the use of the veto in the face of atrocity crimes. I hope it stimulates further thought, analysis and work on these important issues. For those who missed the debates, I posted attacking the legality of Russia’s veto...