Author Archive for
An Hertogen

Weekend Roundup: April 26-May 2, 2014

by An Hertogen

This week on Opinio Juris, Duncan posted an abstract to a book chapter arguing that IHL should adopt a duty to hack. He also argued that reports of the death of treaties are greatly exaggerated.

Peter marked May Day with a post on global consciousness of the non-elites; Kevin argued that the PTC II is not treating defence attorneys fairly; Julian wrote about Florida’s narrow ban on foreign law; and Ryan Scoville contributed a guest post on de jure and de facto recognition as a framework for Zivotofsky.

Finally, Jessica wrapped up the news and listed events and announcements. Kristen also publicized the call for this year’s ASIL Mid-Year Research Forum.

Have a nice weekend!

Weekend Roundup: April 19-25, 2014

by An Hertogen

This week on Opinio Juris, we teamed up with EJIL:Talk! to bring you a transatlantic symposium on Karen Alter’s book The New Terrain of International LawYou can find Karen’s introduction to her book here, followed by comments by Tonya Putnam, Roger Alford and Jacob Katz Cogan. Karen’s reply is here.

Other guests this week were Paula Gaeta who explained why she is not convinced by the ICC’s latest decision on President al-Bashir’s immunity from arrest, and Mike Ramsay who discussed Argentina v. NML Capital and the FISA.

Deborah commented on Steve Vladeck’s essay on post-AUMF detention and posted a surreply to his response over at Just Security

Peter looked at Courts’ involvement in foreign affairs following the US Supreme Court’s decision to accept the Jerusalem passport case on the merits.

Julian explained why in his opinion the Marshall Islands’ US complaint and ICJ applications against the world’s nuclear powers is not going to get very far.

Kristen argued that if we want more effective multilateral sanctions, we should examine not just the design of sanction regimes, but also their termination.

Finally, Jessica wrapped up the news and I listed events and announcements. To all our junior readers out there, there is now less than a week to enter an abstract for our second Emerging Voices symposium.

Many thanks to our guest contributors and have a great weekend!

Emerging Voices Deadline Approaching!

by An Hertogen

To all doctoral students and early career academics or professionals who would like to contribute to our blog in July or August, remember that applications for our second Emerging Voices symposium are still open until May 1. We’d love to hear from you!

More information is here.

Joint Opinio Juris-EJIL:Talk! Book Symposium this week

by An Hertogen

This week we are working with EJIL:Talk! to bring you a symposium on Karen Alter‘s (Northwestern) book The New Terrain of International Law: Courts, Politics, Rights (Princeton University Press). Here is the abstract:

In 1989, when the Cold War ended, there were six permanent international courts. Today there are more than two dozen that have collectively issued over thirty-seven thousand binding legal rulings. The New Terrain of International Law charts the developments and trends in the creation and role of international courts, and explains how the delegation of authority to international judicial institutions influences global and domestic politics.

The New Terrain of International Law presents an in-depth look at the scope and powers of international courts operating around the world. Focusing on dispute resolution, enforcement, administrative review, and constitutional review, Karen Alter argues that international courts alter politics by providing legal, symbolic, and leverage resources that shift the political balance in favor of domestic and international actors who prefer policies more consistent with international law objectives. International courts name violations of the law and perhaps specify remedies. Alter explains how this limited power–the power to speak the law–translates into political influence, and she considers eighteen case studies, showing how international courts change state behavior. The case studies, spanning issue areas and regions of the world, collectively elucidate the political factors that often intervene to limit whether or not international courts are invoked and whether international judges dare to demand significant changes in state practices.

From our side, Tonya Lee Putnam (Columbia – Political Science) and Jacob Katz Cogan (Cincinatti – Law) will provide comments, followed by Karen’s response.

Across the Atlantic, comments will be provided by Antonios Tzanakopoulos (Oxford) and Nico Krisch (IBEI).

As always, we welcome readers’ comments!

Events and Announcements: April 20, 2014

by An Hertogen

Call for Papers

  • The European Society of International Law Interest Group on Peace and Security (ESIL IGPS) and the Research Project on Shared Responsibility in International Law (SHARES Project) organize a joint symposium to be held in conjunction with the 10th ESIL Anniversary Conference in Vienna, Austria, on September 3, 2014. The symposium is entitled “The Changing Nature of Peacekeeping and the Challenges for Jus ad Bellum, Jus in Bello and Human Rights” and it will discuss whether there indeed is a major shift in UN peacekeeping practice and will explore important questions of international law raised by these new practices. We would like to invite candidates to submit a 500 words abstract proposal via email to Prof. Theodore Christakis and Dr. Ilias Plakokefalos by May 4. The proposal should also include the author’s name and affiliation, the author’s brief CV and the author’s contact details, in a single pdf document. Successful applicants will be informed by May 15. More information is available here.

Events

  • ALMA and the Radzyner School of Law of the Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) invite you to the next session of the Joint International Humanitarian Law Forum on April 30, 2014, 18:30 in room C110 (Arazi-Ofer Building, 2nd floor) in the IDC. Prof. Eugene KontorovichDr. Daphne Richemond-Barak and Dr. Ziv Bohrer will discuss the Crimean Peninsula & IHL. Following the presentations, there will be an open round table discussion.
  • Professor Harold Koh will be giving this year’s Clarendon lectures at the University of Oxford, speaking about Law and Globalization. The lectures are open to everyone and will take place over three evenings: Tuesday May 6, 5-6:30pm in the Pichette Auditorium, Pembroke College, followed by a drinks reception in the foyer by the auditorium 6:30-7:30pm; Thursday May 8, 5-6:30pm, The Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, Faculty of Law, St Cross Building: Tuesday May 13, 5-6:30pm, The Gulbenkian lecture theatre, Faculty of Law, St Cross Building.
  • The T.M.C. Asser Instituut is offering five different summer programmes this summer: June 2 – 25: Summer Law Program on International Criminal Law and International Legal Approaches to Terrorism; June 30 – July 4: Summer Programme on International Sports Law: Is Sport Playing by the Rule of Law?; August 25 – 29: Advanced Summer Programme on Countering Terrorism in the Post 9/11 World: Legal Challenges and Dilemmas; August 25 – 29: Summer Programme on International & European Environmental Law: Facing the Challenges?(New in 2014!); September 1 – 5: Summer Programme on Disarmament & Non-Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction in a Changing World (Scholarships available!). More information is available here.
  • The Interest Group on Migration and Refugee Law of the European Society of International Law, the Centre for Migration Law of the Radboud University Nijmegen and the Amsterdam Center for International Law of the University of Amsterdam are pleased to announce Heading to Europe: Safe Haven or Graveyard?, a panel discussion on migration by sea in the Mediterranean. The panel discussion will be held on 16 May 2014 at the Radboud University Nijmegen. For more information and registration visit the website.
  • The Salzburg Law School on International Criminal Law, Humanitarian Law and Human Rights Law (SLS) welcomes applications for its Sixteenth Summer Session, “International Criminal Law at the First World War Centenary – From Consolidation Towards Confrontation?”, Sunday 3 to Friday 15 August 2014. The SLS is a two-week summer programme aimed at postgraduate students, young academics and practitioners. This year’s session will scrutinize principles and procedures of international criminal law, their origins and contemporary challenges to their enforcement. In this context, there will be a special thematic focus on the principle of irrelevance of official capacity under international customary law and the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC) as well as on controversies stemming from the Court’s cases against sitting heads of States, proposed changes to the Rome Statute and policy considerations determining the selection of situations and cases. Other topics include the Kampala amendments to the Rome Statute, the rights of the defence in international criminal proceedings, the role of international investigation commissions, as well as recent decisions and judgements of the ICC and the ICTY. Further information on the academic programme and a preliminary list of speakers are available here. The application period ends on Friday May 9, 2014.
  • The Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights is offering an International Weapons Laws Course, in Geneva from August 4-29, 2014. More information is here.

Last week’s events and announcements can be found here. If you would like to post an announcement on Opinio Juris, please contact us.

Weekend Roundup: April 5-18, 2014

by An Hertogen

This fortnight on Opinio Juris, Julian examined whether the US could legally deny Iran’s new U.N. Ambassador a visa to New York and provided his take on the three main arguments in favor of the visa denial. In a rare instance, Kevin agreed with Julian and elaborated with a post on the security exception in the UN Headquarters’ Agreement.

David Rivkin and Lee Casey surprised Julian with their calls to deploy “lawfare” against Russia. More surprises for Julian arose out of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York’s decision to revive the In re South Africa Apartheid Litigation under the ATS.

In other posts, Kristen wondered how the current gap in international law on the protection of disaster refugees could be filled; Roger discussed the emerging trend of relying on investment arbitration to enforce international trade rights; Craig Allen contributed a guest post on the principle of reasonableness applied by ITLOS in the M/V Virginia G case; and Kevin shared his thoughts on Ukraine’s ad hoc self-referral to the ICC.

Duncan announced the Oxford Guide to Treaties he edited is now available in paperback, and welcomed the publication of a papers presented at a Temple workshop on the writings of Martti Koskenniemi.

As always, we listed events and announcements (1, 2) and Jessica wrapped up the news (1, 2).

Have a nice weekend!

Events and announcements: April 6, 2014

by An Hertogen

Event

  • The United Nations Law Committee of the International Law Association, American Branch, along with The George Washington University Law School, invite you to a brownbag lunch panel on Treaty Survival on Wednesday, April 9, 2014, 1:00 – 2:15 PM in the Moot Court Room, The George Washington University Law School, 2000 H St. NW, Washington DC, 20052. This panel will address the effectiveness of treaties over time, with particular emphasis on the adaptability of treaties to present-day challenges. Can existing treaties, including those of fundamental doctrinal significance, such as the Geneva Conventions or the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, remain effective in an era of rapid change? Can contemplated or future agreements that seek to address evolving areas about which incomplete information exists, such as nanotechnology, geoengineering, synthetic biology, cyberspace and weapons systems, remain relevant and responsive over time? What tools enable international lawyers to assist the international community in addressing these questions? Panellists are our own Duncan Hollis, as well as Sean Murphy, Georg Nolte and Arnold Pronto.

Calls for Papers

  • TDM is calling for a special issue on dispute resolution from a corporate perspective that seeks to widen and deepen the debate on issues that are central to the efficient management of disputes from a corporate perspective. They seek contributions related to dispute management, commercial dispute resolution, managing the cost of dispute resolution, and the future of commercial dispute resolution, but welcome other relevant contributions as well. The editors of the special are: Kai-Uwe Karl (General Electric), Abhijit Mukhopadhyay (Hinduja Group), Michael Wheeler (Harvard Business School) and Heba Hazzaa (Cairo University). Publication is expected in October 2014. Proposals for papers should be submitted to the editors by July 31, 2014. Contact details are available on the TDM website.

Announcements

  • The ICRC has launched its first Research & Debate Cycle on New Technologies and the Modern Battlespace. In recent years, a wide array of new technologies has entered the modern battlefield, giving rise to new methods and means of warfare, such as cyber attacks, armed drones and robots.  While there can be no doubt that IHL applies to them, applying pre-existing legal rules to new technologies may raise the question of whether the rules are sufficiently clear in light of the new technologies’ specific characteristics and foreseeable humanitarian impact. Each of these new technologies raises a host of issues, which the first Research & Debate Cycle proposes to discuss. From March to June 2014, several public events will be organized around the globe, with a view to answering several objectives: connecting academics and researchers on international humanitarian law, scientists, military representatives, human rights lawyers, policy-makers and practitioners;  facilitating discussion, exchange of knowledge and new ideas in relation to the theme of the cycle; ensuring a global outreach, through the involvement of relevant ICRC delegations and contacts in the field; proposing multi-disciplinary solutions to the questions identified. On March 25, the inaugural panel presented the various ethical, legal, scientific, and military issues that new technologies raise for humanitarian law and action, and which the subsequent events will strive to answer. The recording of the panel, as well as several interviews with the speakers, is now available here.
  • The EIUC Venice School of Human Rights will run from June 27 to July 5, 2014 and is accepting applications until May 15, 2014. The EIUC Venice School of Human Rights will update participants on the state of the art debate on human rights issues and stimulate their reflection on the current challenges faced by human rights actors worldwide. After an introduction on current challenges, participants will have the opportunity to learn more about one of these 3 selected topics “Business and Human Rights”, “The Internationalisation of Migration Law and the Role of the EU” and “Freedom of Expression and Assembly Online”. The EIUC Venice School combines theory and practice and its faculty involves internationally recognised academics and practitioners. Prof. Martin Scheinin, former UN Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms while countering terrorism, and Prof. William Schabas from the University of Middlesex will open the Venice School 2014. Check herefor the full programme details.

Last week’s events and announcements can be found here. If you would like to post an announcement on Opinio Juris, please contact us.

Weekend Roundup: March 29-April 4, 2014

by An Hertogen

This week on Opinio Juris, Julian wondered if the ICJ’s judgment in the Whaling in the Antarctic would ring in the end of the Whale Wars. He also curiously awaits the release of the Philippines memorial filed with the PCA in the UNCLOS arbitration against China and assessed China’s reaction to the submission.

Meanwhile, Kevin handed out advice on how to get yourself convicted of terrorism and Chris compared Russia’s rhetoric regarding Crimea to its rhetoric regarding intervention and recognition in Kosovo and South Ossetia.

We also hosted a symposium on the two latest issues of the Harvard International Law Journal. Martins Paparinskis discussed Anthea Roberts’ article on state-to-state investment arbitration, followed by Anthea’s reply. Next, Tim Meyer and Monika Hakimi discussed her article justifying unfriendly unilateralism, followed by a discussion between Christopher Whytock and Greg Shill on judgment arbitrage. Michael Waterstone discussed an article on equal voting participation for Europeans with disabilities. Karen Alter and Suzanne Katzenstein rounded up the symposium with a discussion on the creation of international courts in the 20th century.

Finally, Jessica wrapped up the news and listed events and announcements. If you’re a PhD student, post-doc or have recently started your career and would like to write something for Opinio Juris in July or August, don’t miss the call for abstracts for the second edition of our Emerging Voices symposium.

Many thanks to our guest contributors and have a nice weekend!

Emerging Voices Returns: Call for Abstracts

by An Hertogen

This July and August, we are bringing back our Emerging Voices symposium!

If you are a doctoral student or in the early stages of your career (e.g., post-docs, junior academics or early career practitioners within the first five years of finishing your final degree) and would like to share your research with our readers, please send a 200-word summary of your idea and your CV to opiniojurisblog [at] gmail [dot] com by May 1, 2014. We’ll let you know by the end of May if you’re invited to submit a full post. We’ll also let you know at that point when your post is scheduled to go online. Final submissions between 1000-1500 words will be required two weeks before publication for final review, so at the earliest by mid-June.

If you have any questions, feel free to ask them in the comments or send us an e-mail at the address above.

Weekend Roundup: March 22-28, 2014

by An Hertogen

This week on Opinio Juris, Kevin accused the ICC of fiddling while Libya burns, and relayed news in the Libyan press that Al-Senussi’s and Gaddafi’s trial will start mid-April. He also analysed whether Luis Moreno-Ocampo’s possible representation of LRA victims at the ICC would amount to a conflict of interest.

Roger followed up on his earlier post about using trade remedies to enforce arbitration awards to argue that these remedies are WTO compliant.

Kristen discussed sanctions against Russia and Julian asked whether the US’ spying on Huawei violates international law.

Finally, Jessica wrapped up the news, I listed the events and announcements, and Chris closed of the week with some laughs courtesy of the Internationally Wrongful Memes tumblr.

Have a nice weekend!

Events and Announcements: March 23, 2014

by An Hertogen

Call for Papers

  • The ASIL International Economic Law Interest Group is calling for paper and panel proposals for its 2014 Biennial Research Conference, to be held at the University of Denver’s Sturm School of Law, on November 13-15, 2014. The theme of the conference is “Reassessing International Economic Law & Development: New Challenges for Law & Policy”. They strongly encourage scholars, practitioners, and advanced graduate students to submit proposals to present original research on the theme topic, or on other areas of international economic law. You do not have to be an ASIL or Interest Group member to participate. The full call for papers can be downloaded here. Please contact IEcLIG Co-Chairs Jason Yackee & Elizabeth Trujillo with any questions.
  • The European Society of International Law (ESIL) Interest Group on Business and Human Rights is calling for papers in view of its 3rd Research Workshop at the 10th ESIL Anniversary Conference, to be held in Vienna, Austria, on September 3, 2014. Following the overarching theme of the Research Forum, “International Law and …: Boundaries of International Law and Bridges to Other Fields and Disciplines”, they invite papers addressing the interplay between international law and other fields of law or other disciplines from the perspective of business and human rights. Please submit a 500 words abstract proposal via email to Damiano de Felice by May 31, 2014. Successful applicants will be informed by June 15, 2014, and will need to submit final papers by August 15, 2014. In addition to the abstract, the following information must be provided on the submission: The author’s name and affiliation; The author’s CV, including a list of relevant publications; The author’s contact details; Whether the author is an ESIL member. For the sake of blind peer-reviewing, candidates are requested to include their name and affiliation in the email, but NOT in the abstract itself. Selection criteria are: originality of the work, links to the panel theme, and geographical representation of the speakers. Only one abstract per author will be considered. At the moment of presentation, papers should be unpublished and in an advanced stage of completion. Publication in a book or a special issue of a journal will be considered. In order to participate in the Interest Group panel, speakers must be members of ESIL. The membership can be formalised once abstracts have been accepted.

Events

  • The Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights invites you to a discussion, on March 28, of how human rights law regulates use, procurement, and transfer of weapons. A new book Weapons Under International Human Rights Law, a new publication by Cambridge University Press will be launched during the event. More information is here.

Summer Schools

  • From 29-30 April 2014, the British Institute of International and Comparative Law (BIICL) will be running a two-day programme called ‘Public International Law in Practice’. Click on the links for more information and for registration.
  • The Academy of European Law at the European University Institute (EUI) in Florence, Italy, holds two summer courses each year, on Human Rights Law and the Law of the European Union. The 2014 Human Rights Law course (June 16-27) comprises a General Course on ‘21st Century Human Rights’ by Harold Hongju Koh (Sterling Professor of International Law, Yale Law School) and a series of specialized courses on the topic of ‘Freedom of Religion, Secularism and Human Rights’. There will also be two distinguished lectures, by Bruno Simma (Judge at the Iran-United States Claims Tribunal; former Judge at the International Court of Justice) and Joseph H.H. Weiler (President of the European University Institute). The 2014 Law of the European Union course  (June 30-July 11)  comprises a General Course on ‘The Internal Market as a Legal Concept’ by Stephen Weatherill (Jacques Delors Professor of European Law, Oxford University) and a series of specialized courses on the topic of ‘EU Legal Acts: Challenges and Transformations’. The Summer School will also include a distinguished lecture by Marta Cartabia, an EUI alumna now Judge at the Italian Constitutional Court and Professor of Constitutional Law, Bicocca University in Milan. The deadline for applications is Thursday April 10, 2014. For further information, visit the Academy’s website.
  • The ICC Summer School at the Irish Centre for Human Rights, NUI Galway will take place from June 16-20. More information is here.

Last week’s events and announcements can be found here. If you would like to post an announcement on Opinio Juris, please contact us.

Weekend Roundup: March 15-21, 2014

by An Hertogen

This week on Opinio Juris, we continued last week‘s YLS Sale Symposium with a post by Thomas Gammeltoft-Hansen describing Sale’s legacy as a game of cat and mouse between law and politics, a post by David Martin on the realms of policy and law in refugee protection. In a two part post (1, 2), Guy Goodwin-Gill looked at state practice preceding Sale and argued that the case was not the watershed moment it is seen to be. T. Alexander Aleinikoff discussed a way forward to ensure that the rights of refugees are adequately protected. Harold Koh closed off the symposium with his reflections on Sale’s legacy.

Also continuing from last week was our Ukraine Insta-Symposium. Boris Mamlyuk argued for a better empirical understanding of the facts on the ground to assess the legality of intervention in Ukraine. As the events in Crimea unfolded, questions of recognition and annexation came into the spotlight with a post by Anna Dolidze on the non-recognition of Crimea, one by Chris analyzing the legality of recognition of a secessionist entity, and one by Greg Fox on the Russian-Crimea treaty.

In other posts, Duncan tried to read the tea leaves in the US Senate confirmation hearings for the new head of US Cyber Command. Julian reported from a hearing of the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board on the legality of overseas electronic surveillance and predicted that international law will receive short shrift in the Board’s final report. Andrés Guzmán Escobari rebutted an earlier post by Julian and argued that Bolivia’s ICJ case against Chile to obtain access to the Pacific Ocean is reasonably strong. Roger closed off the week with a post on the use of trade remedies to enforce arbitration awards.

Finally, Jessica wrapped up the news and listed events and announcements.

Many thanks to our guest contributors and have a great weekend!