So . . . What do you think should be in your international law textbook?

by Duncan Hollis

I’m honored to have been invited by Allen Weiner to join him in the forthcoming 7th edition of the textbook, International Law, which he previously edited with the late Professor Barry Carter. We’re just beginning the effort of pulling together the new edition for Aspen this Spring and Summer.

Before we get too far along, I wanted to invite feedback from readers who have used the textbook on what they think of the text.  In particular, we’re interested in hearing about areas that we should be focusing on more closely or areas that we need to avoid cutting as we try to keep the text to a manageable length.  That said, I’d welcome more general feedback on what you like or don’t like about the textbook as well.  Moreover, for those of you who haven’t read it, I’d be interested in suggestions for cases or materials you’ve always wanted to see included in a basic introductory text for international law that have yet to receive sufficient attention.

Of course, I can’t guarantee that we’ll be able to respond to any and all suggestions, let alone adjust the next edition too dramatically from its roots.  Still, I know I speak for Allen in saying that we want to have an open door to new ideas and concepts.  So, feel free to comment below or e-mail me directly if you have suggestions, criticisms, or other thoughts to offer.  Thanks!

 

http://opiniojuris.org/2017/03/20/so-what-do-you-think-should-be-in-your-international-law-textbook/

5 Responses

  1. I have not read this book. But I will certainly have one suggestion to make, namely, to focus on IHL and law relating to non-international armed conflict, low intensity conflicts

  2. Effects of the Internet on International Law (Prosecution of crimes, jurisdiction, personality of automated systems, cyberwarfare etc)

  3. The book would be truly unique with a section on the evolution of philosophical or moral justifications for both ius gentium and the modern international legal system. This is especially important in an age when new erga omnes obligations and jus cogens principles dealing with environment, criminal law, human rights, humanitarian law and intervention in armed conflict (among others) are being actively debated.

  4. The book would be truly unique with a section on the evolution of philosophical or moral justifications for both ius gentium and the modern international legal system. This is especially important in an age when new erga omnes obligations and jus cogens principles dealing with environment, criminal law, human rights, humanitarian law and intervention in armed conflict (among others) are being actively debated…

  5. the old Bishop introductory text was a great–hope this new one, which I have not seen, can break down the various aspects o International Law as did Bishop. Would like to see as well a historical section dealing with how international law developed up to WWI and the humugus hit it took at the Congress of Berlin in 1878 which set back International law to the pre-cave man era.

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