New Edition International Law Frameworks

by Kristen Boon

Chimene Keitner has revised and updated David Bederman’s 2006 treatise on International Law Frameworks. This highly readable (and short) text addresses key cases, core disputes, and essential treaties in international law. Following Professor Bederman’s passing in 2011, Keitner was asked to step in and take over the production of a new edition.   In the preface to this 4th edition, Chimene describes how she has updated and adapted the book:

The approach of this edition is consistent with that of previous editions, but I have modified the structure in places and added substantial discussion of recent developments. The volume is still divided into four parts. The first part provides an overview of the international legal system and discusses the nature, history, and sources of international legal rules, including treaties and custom. It also introduces mechanisms for the peaceful resolution of international disputes, including the role of the World Court (previously saved for the end of the book).

The second part focuses on the subjects of international law, including but not limited to States. Although somewhat exaggerated, there is much truth to the view that the “old” law of nations considered only States to be worthy of legal attention. Today, individuals, juridical persons (including business associations), and organizations may also be considered “subjects” of international law that can bear both rights and responsibilities.

The third part canvasses substantive areas of international legal regulation, including human rights (with a new discussion of global migration), as well as “objects” of international control such as land and maritime boundaries, the international environment, and the global economy. It also considers the law of countermeasures and the laws governing the resort to, and use of, armed force. The chapters on the use of force and armed conflict include new reflections on the role of government lawyers and consider new developments in substantive law in an era of drones and “cyberwarfare.”

The fourth and final part considers the relationship between domestic law and international law. This is the portion of the book most closely geared to the demands of U.S. law practice. At the same time, it introduces readers to other countries’ views on issues such as jurisdiction, immunities, and related considerations in the conduct of foreign policy. A new concluding chapter reflects on key challenges and opportunities for today’s international lawyers, including managing global pandemics, regulating cyberspace, and addressing global inequality.

Many of us have used this book as a supplement, a primer, or even as a core textbook to be read in conjunction with primary source materials.  If you would like to pre-order or request a complementary copy of the book, here is the link.

http://opiniojuris.org/2016/02/15/new-edition-international-law-frameworks/

One Response

  1. Response…Too bad! Where do people find general practice and general opinio juris to support a claim that old CIL (or IL) was focused only on the state? International law has NEVER been merely state-to-state (see http://ssrn.com/abstract=1701992 )

Trackbacks and Pingbacks

  1. There are no trackbacks or pingbacks associated with this post at this time.