Al Gore and the IPCC Win the Nobel Peace Prize

by Kevin Jon Heller

Here is the Nobel Committee’s explanation of the award, which Gore shares with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change:

Indications of changes in the earth’s future climate must be treated with the utmost seriousness, and with the precautionary principle uppermost in our minds. Extensive climate changes may alter and threaten the living conditions of much of mankind. They may induce large-scale migration and lead to greater competition for the earth’s resources. Such changes will place particularly heavy burdens on the world’s most vulnerable countries. There may be increased danger of violent conflicts and wars, within and between states.

Through the scientific reports it has issued over the past two decades, the IPCC has created an ever-broader informed consensus about the connection between human activities and global warming. Thousands of scientists and officials from over one hundred countries have collaborated to achieve greater certainty as to the scale of the warming. Whereas in the 1980s global warming seemed to be merely an interesting hypothesis, the 1990s produced firmer evidence in its support. In the last few years, the connections have become even clearer and the consequences still more apparent.

Al Gore has for a long time been one of the world’s leading environmentalist politicians. He became aware at an early stage of the climatic challenges the world is facing. His strong commitment, reflected in political activity, lectures, films and books, has strengthened the struggle against climate change. He is probably the single individual who has done most to create greater worldwide understanding of the measures that need to be adopted.

By awarding the Nobel Peace Prize for 2007 to the IPCC and Al Gore, the Norwegian Nobel Committee is seeking to contribute to a sharper focus on the processes and decisions that appear to be necessary to protect the world’s future climate, and thereby to reduce the threat to the security of mankind. Action is necessary now, before climate change moves beyond man’s control.

Kudos to the IPCC and Mr. Gore. Fingers crossed that this means Gore will run for President…

http://opiniojuris.org/2007/10/12/al-gore-and-the-ipcc-win-the-nobel-peace-prize/

6 Responses

  1. Al Gore, congratulations on winning the Nobel Peace Prize. Now it is time to announce your wish to become America’s president, take your seat in the White House, and be the leader we have all been waiting for to move beyond the corrupt system of Empire and towards Earth community. Kudos to the Nobel Committee for realizing that sustainability is peace.

  2. Professor Heller,

    I am a little bit surprised by your desire for Gore to run for President. Gore was a fairly conservative Democrat back in his days in the Senate. Actually, I don’t think many on the left remember that fact. I guess with absence the hart grows fonder.

    Or are you thinking strategically because you think Gore is electable?

  3. NSD,

    I think any of the leading Democratic candidates — Clinton, Obama, and Edwards — are electable. Edwards would be my personal choice, not surprisingly, but I don’t think he can win the nomination. And I vastly prefer Gore to either Clinton or Obama — hence my hope that Gore runs.

  4. That should be “is electable,” of course. I’m not completely illiterate…

  5. I seem to recall, in the misty-shrouded past, that a man called Al Gore did in fact run for president…

    I’d point out that climate change seems to have precious little to do with world peace, but ever since the award to Mr. Arafat, I’ve figured any later candidate, by default, has done more for world piece than that previous winner.

  6. I seem to recall, in the misty-shrouded past, that a man called Al Gore did in fact run for president…

    I’d point out that climate change seems to have precious little to do with world peace, but ever since the award to Mr. Arafat, I’ve figured any later candidate, by default, has done more for world peace than that previous winner.

Trackbacks and Pingbacks

  1. There are no trackbacks or pingbacks associated with this post at this time.