International Criminal Law

Well, the Hamdan verdict is in: guilty on five counts of material support to a terrorist organization, but significantly for cases to come - not guilty on the far broader charge of conspiracy. The Times’ story is here. Sentencing to follow this afternoon. This is hardly the end of the story. There will certainly be appeals. But...

Like our readers, I am enjoying the terrific and sophisticated discussion on Ben Wittes' important and highly persuasive book (My short reaction: He's pretty much right about most things). I hate to interrupt this flow with non-Wittes stuff, but I couldn't resist a brief note on the growing non-U.S.-related  backlash against the ICC.   Indeed, just as the U.S. seems to...

My apologies for implying that Ben is a neoconservative, but I think that the title of my last post -- "Damning International Tribunals With Faint Praise" -- is accurate. Stray or not, Ben's comment praises the international tribunals for (ostensibly) not offering defendants the same kinds of protections that defendants enjoy in U.S. civilian courts.  The belief that the Rome...

I had planned to lurk on the sidelines until the discussion of Ben's fascinating book moved to the "need" for a new interrogation statute -- I, for one, am more than happy to have "interrogation laws that operate only at the highest altitude (nothing cruel or inhumane, nothing that causes severe pain or suffering) but never come down to earth,"...

No, that's not a snarky question. He has consistently made comments that seem to indicate far more openness to the Court than the typical Republican.  In 2002, he voted against the appalling American Service-Members Protection Act (aka "The Hague Invasion Act").  In 2005, he said “I want us in the ICC, but I’m not satisfied that there are enough safeguards.”...

I really wanted to ignore the Wall Street Journal editorial that Julian mentioned yesterday, filing it in the "life is too short" category.  But I can't help myself, because the editorial is just shockingly factually inaccurate -- to say nothing of its rather curious judgment, such as the idea that Bashir "may be the only man able to guarantee...

AFP is reporting that Radovan Karadzic,  the former president of Republika Srpska and the former head of the euphemistically named Serb Democratic Party, has been arrested.  This is great news -- if the ICTY had a "most wanted" deck of cards, Karadzic would be the Ace of Spades: As early as July 1991, the Bosnian Serb leaders, and in particular, Radovan...

As frustration with the Bush administration's War on Transparency continues to mount, scholars and pundits are beginning to suggest that the U.S. should think about creating a South African-style Truth and Reconciliation Commission to investigate the administration's many crimes.  Nicholas Kristof is one example. Richard Clarke is another.  And a third is Katherine Tiedemann, writing in The American Strategist: The South...

It's been a while since I wrote about Luis Posada Carriles, former CIA asset and admitted terrorist, who currently walks the streets of Miami as a free man due to the Bush administration's disinterest in punishing terrorism committed against countries the US doesn't like. Fortunately, Posada Carriles may not be free much longer, thanks to a decision by the Panamanian Supreme...

I noted a few days ago that the Security Council is unlikely to pass a resolution deferring the Prosecutor's investigation of Bashir, given the number of non-permanent and permanent members of the Council who are supporters of the ICC.  I think that position is even more sound in light of the European Union's promise today -- on the 10th anniversary...