International Human Rights Law

It’s a pleasure to be able to comment on Pierre-Hugues Verdier’s excellent, if critical, article on networks. I respond as a defender: in my view, networks have notched some impressive achievements, and at their best, have become primary vehicles of international governance. From bank capital adequacy to mutual recognition on drug regulation to accounting standards, their list of...

I would first like to thank Opinio Juris for hosting this online symposium on my recent article, Transnational Regulatory Networks and Their Limits. Opinio Juris has quickly become an invaluable means of keeping up with current developments in international law, and I am delighted to have this opportunity to share my thoughts with you. In essence, the article sounds a cautionary...

Ed Whelan responds to my post mostly through name-calling, labeling me an incoherent, liberal academic. Yet, no amount of ad hominem attack can obscure the basic weakness of his argument. He continues to worry that international elites will subvert the will of democratically elected leaders in the executive and legislative branches. But who exactly are these international elites and how...

Homework, people, homework: Bangladesh may request the International Criminal Court to put on trial Pakistani forces for alleged war crimes, a top official said Tuesday. 'We will take the matter to the International Criminal Court and seek the trial of the members of the Pakistani occupation forces who committed crimes against humanity during our liberation war,' State Minister for Liberation War...

I've always loved the New York Times.  I've been reading it since I was a kid.  But this comment by the paper's Executive Editor, Bill "Isn't the Iraq War Just Swell?" Keller, makes me want to cancel my subscription: Saving the New York Times now ranks with saving Darfur as a high-minded cause. Yeah, propping up the Gray Lady is just as...

The more things change, the more things stay the same -- at least with this administration: He had become the most vocal opponent of the trial of Guantanamo Bay detainee Omar Khadr, taking on a position more akin to politician than lawyer and launching a two-year public and media campaign that landed him on the front pages of newspapers and inside...

It's not exactly international law, but he was my professor at CU -- one of the very best I ever had -- and, in order to rule in his favor, the jury had to find that a majority of the Regents used his infamous 9/11 essay as a "substantial or motivating factor" in the decision to fire him.  So I...

I know I shouldn't let mainstream American conservatives' ignorance of international law bother me, but it does.  Today's example: The United States is not a signatory to the International Criminal Court, and Spanish judge and prosecutor Baltasar Garzon is a good reason why. He is considering a lawsuit by lawyers for human rights groups seeking the arrest and extradition of six former...

Following-up on my post on Harold Koh's nomination, in the first part of this post I round-up some links to new stories and blog posts on Koh's nomination. Moreover, after the "continue reading" jump there is a guest post from Prof. Anupam Chander of the University of California, Davis (currently visiting at the University of Chicago). In the last day or so,...

The UN Human Rights Council adopted a resolution last week on "Human Rights and Climate Change," in follow up to the January  report by the Office of the High Commissioner on Human Rights on the Relationship between Climate Change and Human Rights, The Council resolution is significant less for what it says than for the fact of its adoption, which reflects...