Weekend Roundup: April 26-May 2, 2014

by An Hertogen

This week on Opinio Juris, Duncan posted an abstract to a book chapter arguing that IHL should adopt a duty to hack. He also argued that reports of the death of treaties are greatly exaggerated.

Peter marked May Day with a post on global consciousness of the non-elites; Kevin argued that the PTC II is not treating defence attorneys fairly; Julian wrote about Florida’s narrow ban on foreign law; and Ryan Scoville contributed a guest post on de jure and de facto recognition as a framework for Zivotofsky.

Finally, Jessica wrapped up the news and listed events and announcements. Kristen also publicized the call for this year’s ASIL Mid-Year Research Forum.

Have a nice weekend!

Weekend Roundup: April 19-25, 2014

by An Hertogen

This week on Opinio Juris, we teamed up with EJIL:Talk! to bring you a transatlantic symposium on Karen Alter’s book The New Terrain of International LawYou can find Karen’s introduction to her book here, followed by comments by Tonya Putnam, Roger Alford and Jacob Katz Cogan. Karen’s reply is here.

Other guests this week were Paula Gaeta who explained why she is not convinced by the ICC’s latest decision on President al-Bashir’s immunity from arrest, and Mike Ramsay who discussed Argentina v. NML Capital and the FISA.

Deborah commented on Steve Vladeck’s essay on post-AUMF detention and posted a surreply to his response over at Just Security

Peter looked at Courts’ involvement in foreign affairs following the US Supreme Court’s decision to accept the Jerusalem passport case on the merits.

Julian explained why in his opinion the Marshall Islands’ US complaint and ICJ applications against the world’s nuclear powers is not going to get very far.

Kristen argued that if we want more effective multilateral sanctions, we should examine not just the design of sanction regimes, but also their termination.

Finally, Jessica wrapped up the news and I listed events and announcements. To all our junior readers out there, there is now less than a week to enter an abstract for our second Emerging Voices symposium.

Many thanks to our guest contributors and have a great weekend!

Weekend Roundup: April 5-18, 2014

by An Hertogen

This fortnight on Opinio Juris, Julian examined whether the US could legally deny Iran’s new U.N. Ambassador a visa to New York and provided his take on the three main arguments in favor of the visa denial. In a rare instance, Kevin agreed with Julian and elaborated with a post on the security exception in the UN Headquarters’ Agreement.

David Rivkin and Lee Casey surprised Julian with their calls to deploy “lawfare” against Russia. More surprises for Julian arose out of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York’s decision to revive the In re South Africa Apartheid Litigation under the ATS.

In other posts, Kristen wondered how the current gap in international law on the protection of disaster refugees could be filled; Roger discussed the emerging trend of relying on investment arbitration to enforce international trade rights; Craig Allen contributed a guest post on the principle of reasonableness applied by ITLOS in the M/V Virginia G case; and Kevin shared his thoughts on Ukraine’s ad hoc self-referral to the ICC.

Duncan announced the Oxford Guide to Treaties he edited is now available in paperback, and welcomed the publication of a papers presented at a Temple workshop on the writings of Martti Koskenniemi.

As always, we listed events and announcements (1, 2) and Jessica wrapped up the news (1, 2).

Have a nice weekend!

Weekend Roundup: March 29-April 4, 2014

by An Hertogen

This week on Opinio Juris, Julian wondered if the ICJ’s judgment in the Whaling in the Antarctic would ring in the end of the Whale Wars. He also curiously awaits the release of the Philippines memorial filed with the PCA in the UNCLOS arbitration against China and assessed China’s reaction to the submission.

Meanwhile, Kevin handed out advice on how to get yourself convicted of terrorism and Chris compared Russia’s rhetoric regarding Crimea to its rhetoric regarding intervention and recognition in Kosovo and South Ossetia.

We also hosted a symposium on the two latest issues of the Harvard International Law Journal. Martins Paparinskis discussed Anthea Roberts’ article on state-to-state investment arbitration, followed by Anthea’s reply. Next, Tim Meyer and Monika Hakimi discussed her article justifying unfriendly unilateralism, followed by a discussion between Christopher Whytock and Greg Shill on judgment arbitrage. Michael Waterstone discussed an article on equal voting participation for Europeans with disabilities. Karen Alter and Suzanne Katzenstein rounded up the symposium with a discussion on the creation of international courts in the 20th century.

Finally, Jessica wrapped up the news and listed events and announcements. If you’re a PhD student, post-doc or have recently started your career and would like to write something for Opinio Juris in July or August, don’t miss the call for abstracts for the second edition of our Emerging Voices symposium.

Many thanks to our guest contributors and have a nice weekend!