Archive of posts for category
Weekend Roundup

Weekend Roundup: July 13-19, 2013

by An Hertogen

This week on Opinio Juris, we continued our Emerging Voices symposium. Patricia Tarre Moser started the week with her proposal for the unilateral withholding of sovereign immunity as a countermeasure against jus cogens violations. Scott McKenzie wrote on the application of international water law principles to the simmering tension between Egypt and Ethiopia on the latter’s decision to dam the Nile. Daniel Seah wrote about implied conferrals in ASEAN. Tendayi Achiume argued in her post that efforts to combat xenophobia faced by refugees and migrants need to be more aware of the underlying socio-economic conditions. Chelsea Purvis pleaded for more engagement with African human rights law. The Emerging Voices symposium will take a one week break to make space for a symposium on the two lead articles in the latest issue of the American Journal of International Law, starting on Monday.

In a guest post, Ozan Varol argued why the Egyptian military’s ouster of President Morsi was not a democratic coup.

Kevin updated us on the latest twist in Libya’s efforts to avoid handing over Saif to the ICC. At least Crossing Lines is even more confused about the ICC’s jurisdiction, although Kevin admitted to finding this week’s episode quite interesting. Sometimes fiction can teach international lawyers something though, as Chris explored in this post on what political science fiction can bring to international law.

What isn’t science fiction though is the growing market in which hackers sell computer vulnerabilities they have discovered. Chris posted about the sometimes perverse incentives to regulate this market, particularly once governments get involved.

In other posts, Kevin accused the US of applying double standards on the prosecution of money laundering in support of terrorism, and described the Fourth Circuit’s decision in US v Sterling as the most compelling defense of WIkileaksKen wrote about the Supreme Court’s upcoming review of Bauman v. DaimlerChrysler, and the questions it raises for extraterritoriality; and Kristen posted about new scholarship on the legal implications of the Syrian conflict.

As always, Jessica provided you with weekday news wraps and we listed events and announcements.  Kevin also announced he is moving to SOAS in early 2014.

Finally, if you like our blog, we’d love for you to nominate us for the ABA’s 7th annual Blawg 100.

Thank you to our guest posters and have a nice weekend!

Weekend Roundup: July 6-12, 2013

by An Hertogen

This week on Opinio Juris, we kicked off our inaugural Emerging Voices symposium with a post by Christopher Warren on the disciplinary fragmentation between law and other areas of the humanities. Fragmentation between different investment regimes prompted Maninder Malli to argue for minilateral approaches in international investment law as a middle ground between atomized BITs and unattainable multilateral initiatives. In his post, Scott Robinson proposed an “Ottawa Process” to achieve an LGBTQ Treaty. Also on human rights, Ruvi Ziegler argued that the European Court of Human Rights has misapplied the ‘margin of appreciation’-doctrine in its decision on expats’ voting eligibility. Otto Spijkers and Arron Honniball rounded up the first week of the symposium with a post on global public participation in the development of the Sustainable Development Goals.

In our regular posts, Chris wrote on the overlapping interests around Okinawan independence and Duncan posted a link to the 2012 edition of the U.S. Department of State’s Digest of U.S. practice in international law. Immunity was the topic of two posts, one by Duncan on the costs of diplomatic immunity for host states, and one by Kristen with an update on the UN’s response to the complaint by Haiti Cholera victimsKevin marvelled again at the broad jurisdiction of the ICC, at least in Crossing Lines. He was also critical about an op-ed by Ken Roth on the specific direction requirement, which he said conflated different modes of participation.

Our bloggers have also been busy outside the blog: you can read more about Ken’s views on the UN in David Bosco’s interview with him and Brett Schaefer, and about Chris’ work in a report he co-authored on Managing Intractable Conflicts: Lessons from Moldova and Cyprus.

As always, Jessica provided weekday news wraps and we had our weekly listing of events and announcements Deborah also announced an event by the ICRC and the ASIL’s Lieber Society on 150 years of War Regulation.

Many thanks to our Emerging Voices participants, and have a nice weekend!

Weekend Roundup: June 29-July 5, 2013

by An Hertogen

This week on Opinio Juris, Kevin posted how there will be no golden arches in the West Bank, kept track of the latest episode of Crossing Lines, and wondered about the anonymity of an ICTY witness whose name was made public by the ICTY.

Ken turned the spotlight back to the Chevron/Ecuador dispute. A Washington Post profile on the dispute led him to inquire about third-party litigation finance. He also pointed to Julian’s WSJ op-ed, with George Conway, on Chevron’s legal offensive.

Julian has been busy, he also posted an abstract of his paper on the lack of enforcement of ICSID rewards in China.

Peter marked Independence Day with a post on paths away from citizenship used by expat Americans burdened by FATCA filings.

Jessica returned from holiday with her weekday news wraps, and we also listed events and announcements.

Finally, a technical glitch is plaguing our e-mail updates, but we hope to have it resolved soon.

Have a nice weekend!

Weekend Roundup: June 22-28, 2013

by An Hertogen

This week on Opinio Juris, our main event was a book symposium on Katerina Linos’ The Democratic Foundations of Policy Diffusion, introduced here (along with details on OUP’s special offer to our readers). David Zaring and Larry Helfer kicked off the symposium on Monday, and Katerina responded here. On Tuesday, Eric Posner commented on the relationship between policy diffusion and international law, and Ryan Goodman discussed the findings of Katerina’s political opinion experiments. Katerina’s response at the end of day 2 can be found here. On Wednesday, Anu Bradford described how the book can inform the debate on international organizations, and Rachel Brewster welcomed the book’s insights on the influence of international law on national politics. Katerina’s response is here. On the final day of the symposium, Pierre Verdier asked whether the mechanism of policy diffusion would also apply in other areas of international law and policy co-ordination; Harlan Cohen reflected on the book’ conclusions and implications; and Roger raised the question about the role of courts in the diffusion process. Katerina’s final response is here.

The symposium also tied in nicely with Peter’s post on a new sovereigntist essay in Foreign Affairs. As Peter points out, Katerina’s findings may suggest that the tide is shifting on international law.

Roger reviewed Andrew Guzman’s book Overheated, following Hari Osofsky’s review last Friday.

Kevin followed up on the fallout of Judge Harhoff’s lettercalled NBC’s new show Crossing Lines an “unmitigated disaster” and was sceptical about the implications, according to John Dugard’s article, of the ASP’s President’s failure to table a letter on Palestinian statehood. He also recommended a new essay by Ohlin, Van Sliedregt, and Weigend on the Control Theory of Perpetration.

In the category of “oddball questions of international law”, Duncan discussed a Canadian case on diplomatic immunity in case of a dog bite.

Finally, we listed events and announcements and provided weekday news wraps.

Many thanks to our guest contributors, and have an nice weekend!

Weekend Roundup: June 16-21, 2013

by An Hertogen

This week on Opinio Juris, Kevin flagged three problems with the PTC’s decision on Libya’s obligation to surrender al-Senussi to the ICC. He also discussed Libya’s admissibility challenge: he criticized the defence’s response to the challenge for adopting the due process thesis and he argued why the President’s refusal to excuse one of the Appeals Chamber judges is erroneous.  Kevin also turned his attention to the ICTY with a post on what he called the real Judge Meron scandal.

Kristen reported on a speech by Judge Gaja on a duty to prevent for international organisations, and Neomi Rao followed up on last week’s guest post, with two more on the politics and the calculus of R2P.

We closed off the week with Hari Osofsky’s book review of Andrew Guzman’s book “Overheated”.

As always, there were our weekday news wraps and our listing of events and announcements. Duncan also flagged an upcoming conference at the Duke-Geneva Institute of International Law on the role of opinio juris in customary international law.

Have a nice weekend!

Weekend Roundup: June 8-15, 2013

by An Hertogen

This week on Opinio Juris, there was a lot of news to cover with NSA leak and the US administration’s decision to arm Syrian rebels. On the first, Julian thought Hong Kong was a dumb choice of refuge for the NSA leaker. Chris dug deeper into domestic data-mining with earlier stories about the NSA’s activities. Peter addressed the position of expat Americans in PRISM. Further on cyber-issues, Duncan highlighted Japan’s new Cybersecurity Strategy.

On the second bit of news, Julian argued why the “red line” crossed by Syria is meaningless in terms of the legal framework restricting US intervention in Syria. Neomi Rao contributed a guest post on the implications of the Syria crisis for the R2P doctrine. As announced by Julian here, Neomi will continue to blog on R2P next week, so stay tuned!

Other internationally relevant news can be found in the weekday news wraps.

First in string of guest posts, Michael Lewis argued that Pakistan has withdrawn its consent to US drone strikes in its territoryJames Stewart then responded to Kevin’s defence last week of the ICTY’s new “specific direction” standard for aiding and abetting. Finally, Elizabeth Wilson returned to the discussion of Kiobel to refute Samuel Moyn’s argument in his ForeignAffairs post, by delving into the historical background of anti-Shell protests in Ogoniland.

In other posts, Duncan pointed to a recent article by Jean Galbraith on the treaty-implementing power of Congress in historical practice, and Kristen reported back from a conference in Leiden on privileges and immunities of international organizations. If this inspires you to write or to attend a conference, check out this week’s listing of calls for papers and events here.

Have a nice weekend (especially Jessica who has a big day today!)

Weekend Roundup: May 25-31, 2013

by An Hertogen

This week on Opinio Juris, we teamed up with SHARES Blog for a symposium on the intersection between the law of the sea and the law of responsibility, introduced here by Kristen. A first series of posts dealt with whaling. Natalie Klein contrasted responsibility regimes on whales and sharks. In his comment, Tim Stephens expressed hope that the ICJ will apply article 48 of the Articles on State Responsibility in the Whaling in the Antarctic case. Irini Papanicolopulu also discussed the international responsibility of non-state actors in the whaling dispute, which led Julian to ponder whether non-state actors are more important than states.

Further on living marine resources, Yoshinobu Takei asked whether the law of responsibility can play a role in international fisheries management. Ilias Plakokefalos commented that, as desirable as it is to apply the law of state responsibility to overfishing, it will be no easy feat. Tim Stephens’ comment pointed out how regulatory efforts to deal with overfishing tend to focus on specialized regimes rather than the law of responsibility. Anastasia Telesetsky argued in favour of imposing a due diligence obligation on flag states to avoid damage to marine resources. Ilias Plakokefalos raised two questions regarding the role of the flag state in terms of its international responsibility.

Finally, there was also a discussion of humans at sea with Seline Trevisanut’s post on responsibility for search and rescue operations, on which Tim Stephens provided an Australian perspective in his comment.

In other posts, Ken returned to his old favourite of EVOO, while Kevin brought you a breaking news update that the ICC’s Pre-Trial Chamber has rejected Libya’s admissibility challenge. Kevin also mentioned two unpleasant possibilities about the drone programme, and was disturbed by threats of genocide against Shia in Syria. A guest post by Onur Güven highlighted three challenging questions during the Third CWC Review Conference that recently took place in The Hague.

Finally, as always, we listed events and announcements and brought you the weekday news wraps.

Many thanks to our guest contributors and have a nice weekend!

 

Weekend Roundup: May 18-24, 2013

by An Hertogen

This week on Opinio Juris, drone strikes unsurprisingly took center stage. In anticipation of President Obama’s speech, Jonathan Horowitz contributed a guest post on their human rights impact and Ken pointed to his new essay arguing the case for drone strikes. Deborah linked to the transcript of the speech here, and pointed to two things she liked about itDeborah also discussed the White House Fact Sheet on Use of Force Procedures, and summed it all up with a post on what the newly released documents on targeted killing tell us compared to the leaked DOJ White Paper a few months ago. Kevin considered the requirement of “near certainty” of no civilian casualties a blatant lie that made him distrustful of all claims made in the speech.  He followed this up with a post outlining two problems with the “near certainty” standard and another arguing that the standards for the use of force in the fact sheet are a retreat from IHL. In a guest post Michael W. Lewis argued that Obama got it right

In other posts, Kevin posted a must-see link to a report visualizing international criminal justice and recommended an article by one of his students on the Kapo trials

We also revisited our discussion of Samantar, with Ingrid Wuerth’s guest post on foreign official immunity, and of the Philippines-China UNCLOS arbitration, with a post by Julian who wasn’t convinced by Professor Stefan Talmon’s argument that all of the Philippines’ claims against China fall outside of the tribunal’s jurisdiction. Julian also asked whether we should care about the upcoming hearings by the US Senate Foreign Relations Committee on ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

Speaking of international conventions, Duncan got inspired by Jennifer Lawrence to draft a petition to the White House to ratify the VCLTIO.

Finally, as always we provided you with a list of events and announcements and with weekday news wraps.

Many thanks to our guest contributors and have a nice weekend!

Weekend Roundup: May 11-17, 2013

by An Hertogen

This week on Opinio Juris, Kevin was surprised by an unexpected dissenter in Kenya’s request to the Security Council to terminate the ICC’s Kenya cases. He also analysed whether the ICC has jurisdiction over Israel’s attack on the Mavi Marmara and particularly whether the flotilla attack qualifies as a “situation”. He followed up with a post asking why the Comoros are represented by Turkish lawyers in their referral request and why the referral request was only filed now. He also examined whether the PTC could review an OTP decision not to investigate a situation referred to it.

Kevin called on the ICC to keep its website updated, and listed four errors in the description of NBC’s upcoming series Crossing Lines on the ICC Police Unit, poignantly illustrating why outreach by the ICC itself is important to avoid a distorted public understanding of the ICC.

Peter asked whether the Bangladesh Factory Safety Accord was a watershed moment in global governance, while Roger pointed out problems with the Accord’s arbitration clause.

Julian put the spotlight on the confusing legal background of the Senkaku/Diaoyu Islands dispute, and discussed whether California’s Armenian Genocide Law can be struck down on the basis of “field pre-emption”.

Bill Dodge provided another guest post on Yousef v Samantar, in response to last week’s post by Ingrid Wuerth.

Finally, we listed events and announcements and Jessica provided her weekday news wraps.

Have a nice weekend!

Weekend Roundup: May 4-10, 2013

by An Hertogen

This week on Opinio Juris, the discussion of Kiobel continued with guest posts by Jordan Wells asking whether corporate liability is jurisdictional, and Anthony Colangelo arguing that Kiobel actually contradicts Morrison – the case on which it is supposedly based. Kevin asked whether the Al Shimari  v. CACI case could be a model for post-Kiobel ATS cases.

We also returned to last week‘s discussion of the decision by the Court of Appeals in Versailles on corporate liability for involvement in the construction of Jerusalem Light Rail, with an assessment of the case by Milena Sterio.

Another guest post this week was by Ingrid Wuerth on Yousuf v Samantar.

Peter argued that Ted Cruz’ birthplace isn’t a reason to oppose his nascent candidacy for the US Presidency and pointed out another Obama speech trying to reinvigorate the notion of citizenship.

Kevin discussed the finding of the Commission of Inquiry on Syria that the rebels, rather than the government, may have been responsible for deploying chemical weapons against civilians. Despite his past forays in reality TV, Kevin was still surprised by The President – a Palestinian TV show to (mock-)pick a new President.

Kristen discussed the transformation of the Permanent Court of Arbitration. She also drew our attention to a new case filed at the European Court of Human Rights, alleging that Poland violated its human rights obligations due to its involvement in the CIA’s black sites and the extraordinary rendition of Abu Zubaydah.

Ken predicted that autonomous cars could force us to dust off the 1949 Geneva Convention on Road Traffic, and discussed a new bill to be introduced to increase congressional oversight over kill-or-capture missions conducted by the US military outside of Afghanistan. Further on the war on terror, Chris recommended reading Harold Koh’s speech at Oxford Union.

Julian worried that China was playing a dangerous game floating claims about sovereignty over Okinawa.

Kristen posted a call for papers for the 2013 ASIL Research Forum, which she co-organizes. Other calls for papers can be found in our events and announcements. Finally, Jessica also provided you with weekday news wraps.

Have a nice weekend!

Weekend Roundup: April 27 – May 3, 2013

by An Hertogen

This week on Opinio Juris, the debate on Kiobel continued. Katherine Florey pointed out how the decision will deepen the divide between state and federal approaches to extraterritoriality issues. Ken Anderson argued that the ATS should be understood as the “law of the hegemon”. Peter agreed with Samuel Moyn that more attention to corporate social responsibility regulation could potentially have a broader impact in improving human rights than high profile ATS cases. Corporate social responsibility was also central to Peter’s post on the impact of recent tragedies in the Bangladesh garment industry on voluntary corporate codes.

Eugene Kontorovich wrote a guest post on the recent decision of a French Court of Appeals rejecting claims that the contract between Alstom Transport and the State of Israel for the construction of the Jerusalem Light Rail was illegal due to a violation of international law. Disagreeing with Eugene, Kevin pointed out that the Court of Appeal is silent about the possibility of a war crime under the Rome Statute.

On another controversial dispute involving a big corporation, Roger wrote about an Ontario Court’s decision to dismiss the Ecuadorian plaintiffs’ efforts to enforce the Ecuadorian judgment against Chevron Canada.

In news from international courts, Julian was surprised by reports about the ICJ Registrar calling the Bolivia’s application against Colombia “impeccable“, since he thought Bolivia’s case was ridiculously weak. Should the case reach the merits and go against Colombia, chances are though that we’ll end up with Colombian complaints about biased judges after the conclusion of the case, as it did for the recent decision in its case against Nicaragua.

Turning to the ICC, Kevin was troubled by Judge van den Wyngaert’s decision to withdraw from the ICC’s Uhuru Kenyatta case, and followed up with further thoughts. He also congratulated Leiden for winning the ICC Moot Court.

In other posts, Julian pointed out how China is now also pushing the boundary with India, and  asked whether force feeding of detainees on a hunger strike is always illegal. Kevin noted with horror a quote from Ari Fleischer on the difference between Nazis and terrorists, and recommended Mrs. Shipley’s Ghost: The Right to Travel and Terrorist Watchlists

As always, we provided news wraps and a list of events and announcements. Many thanks to all our “younger” readers for the many New Voices abstracts. It’s wonderful to see such a great response! Jessica and I are working through the submissions and plan to finalize the selection by mid-May.

Have a nice weekend!

Weekend Roundup: April 20 – 26, 2013

by An Hertogen

This week on Opinio Juris, we continued last week‘s Kiobel Insta-Symposium. Quoting from his and John Yoo’s Forbes contribution, Julian argued that the rejection of universal civil jurisdiction is common sense because it leaves the decision on foreign policy consequences of extraterritoriality to the political branches. He also drew our attention to two positive assessments of the opinion, by John Bellinger and Eugene Kontorovich. Austen Parrish offered an alternative narrative about the meaning of Kiobel, seeing it as a welcome retreat from US unilateralism towards more multilateralism.

The many unanswered questions in Kiobel continued to invite commentary. Roger listed various activities with some link to US territory that may still be subject of future ATS litigation. Beth Stephens also predicted many years of continuing litigation, and preferred the world pre-Kiobel. Examples of upcoming cases were also discussed. Roger pointed out how the Supreme Court has already granted certiorari in DaimlerChrysler AG v Bauman, a human rights case involving jurisdiction over foreign corporations, and Roger Phillips discussed two piracy cases with mixed loci delicti that will soon arrive at the Supreme Court.

Bill Dodge argued that because of the unanswered questions, Kiobel is only a Pyrrhic victory for the position on extraterritoriality first pushed by the Bush administration and urged the human rights and business communities to reach a compromise on a statute that would end the litigation. Milan Markovich argued that it could also turn out to be a Pyrrhic victory for corporate defendants and could lead to more settlements to avoid discovery proceedings into whether claims “touch and concern” the US territory.

Accusations about the use of chemical weapons against civilians in Syria, as reported in our weekday news wraps, raised the question whether Obama’s “red line” had been crossed. Julian was sceptical as to why Assad’s use of chemical weapons would justify an intervention in Syria under US and international law, and Deborah similarly explored whether there is a legal basis for intervention.

Other recent events that prompted posts were the Boston bombings, which Kevin argued fall within at least one definition of terrorism that does not require acts to be politically or ideologically motivated, and the collapse of a garment factory in Bangladesh, which Roger hoped would provide an incentive to sign up to agreements, such as the Bangladesh Fire and Building Safety Agreement, that include a binding arbitration clause to ensure better protection of human rights.

In news from international courts, Julian updated us on the appointment of the final arbitrators for the UNCLOS arbitration lodged by the Philippines against China, and assessed China’s “talking points” on the case. He also urged the Supreme Court to follow the ICJ’s lead and release video recordings of oral hearings.  On the US-ICC relationship, Julian ventured that a cultural change is required if it is to blossom into a love affair. More news from the ICC came from Kevin, who worried that a funding crisis was behind the OPCD’s request to withdraw from the Saif Gaddafi case, and the Pre-Trial Chamber’s approval of a new lawyer.

Finally, Kevin corrected an old post on whether Bill Keller of the NYTimes can be charged with aiding and abetting the enemy like Bradley Manning.

As always, we listed events and announcements that may be of interest to our readers. And remember, there is still time for grad students and recent grads out there to submit an abstract for our New Voices symposium!

Have a nice weekend!