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Weekly News Wrap: Monday, November 24, 2014

by Jessica Dorsey

Your weekly selection of international law and international relations headlines from around the world:

Africa

Middle East and Northern Africa

Asia

Europe

  • Britain is facing the biggest terrorism threat in its history and has foiled around 40 major plots since suicide bombers attacked London in 2005, Home Secretary Theresa May said on Monday.
  • Lower oil prices and Western financial sanctions imposed over the Ukraine crisis will cost Russia around $130-140 billion a year – equivalent to around 7 percent of its economy – Finance Minister Anton Siluanov said on Monday.
  • The United States will keep troops in Poland and the Baltic states for at least the next year as tensions with Russia remain, the commander of U.S. land forces in Europe said on Sunday.
  • A week-long operation to clear the wreckage from the crash site of Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 in Ukraine has been completed, according to the Dutch government.
  • The number of Germans fighting alongside Islamic State militants in Syria and Iraq has increased sharply to 550 and around 180 have returned, the head of Germany’s domestic intelligence said in a newspaper interview published on Sunday.

Americas

UN/World

http://opiniojuris.org/2014/11/24/weekly-news-wrap-monday-november-24-2014/
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Mini-Symposium: James Stewart’s The Turn to Corporate Criminal Liability for International Crimes–Transcending the Alien Tort Statute

by Jessica Dorsey

This week we will host a mini-symposium on James G. Stewart’s latest article, The Turn to Corporate Criminal Liability for International Crimes: Transcending the Alien Tort Statute. James has been an Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Law at Allard Hall, University of British Columbia, where he as been since 2009. Previously he was an Associate-in-Law at Columbia Law School in New York. He has also been an Appeals Counsel with the Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and has also worked for the Legal Division of the International Committee of the Red Cross and the Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. James primarily works on the relationship between atrocity, commerce, and international criminal justice and has published extensively on these subjects.

Between today and Wednesday, Samuel Moyn (Harvard University), Steven Ratner (University of Michigan) and Beth Stephens (Rutgers) will comment on the article article and the author will respond.

It is our pleasure to welcome these scholars to Opinio Juris this week and we look forward to thoughtful comments and questions from our readership as well.

http://opiniojuris.org/2014/11/24/mini-symposium-james-stewarts-turn-corporate-criminal-liability-international-crimes-transcending-alien-tort-statute/
This entry was posted in Academic Symposia, Featured Posts.

Weekend Roundup: November 16-22, 2014

by Jessica Dorsey

Over the past week on Opinio Juris, we again enjoyed a lot of different perspectives from our guest bloggers, beginning with Rob Howse, whom Kristen introduced as this week’s featured guest blogger. He highlighted the return of neo-conservativism in Washington, reminded us of Alexandre Kojève’s being a neglected figure in the history of international law and also discussed the breakthrough at recent WTO talks and the trade facilitation agreement this week. He also posted on Liam Murphy’s book What Makes International Law Law?

Additionally, we heard from S. I. Strong announcing that the preliminary results from a recent empirical study on international commercial mediation and conciliation are now available.

Nicolás Carrillo-Santarelli talked about the most recent events in Colombia with the negotiations between the government and FARC rebels being suspended due to the and the kidnapping under IHL, including discussion around the illegality of deprivations of liberty, which sparked quite an intellectual debate in the comments.

A post also came in from Andrea Pin on the Italian Constitutional Court, the International Court of Justice and German war crimes. Duncan French and Jean d’Aspremont co-blogged on the ILC project on the identification of customary international law in summary of the two-day expert level seminar hosted by Lincoln Law School and the Manchester International Law Center.

Roger wrote up his analysis on the Ninth Circuit’s muddled comity analysis in Mujica v. Airscan while Kevin worked out some of his thoughts on the baffling Comoros decision and introduced a new videogame challenging the player to survive as long as possible as a civilian in a war-torn fictional city. Additionally, he introduced and congratulated the newly minted Dr. Mark Kersten.

Finally, I wrapped up the news and listed events and announcements.

Many thanks to our guest contributors and have a nice weekend!

http://opiniojuris.org/2014/11/22/weekend-roundup-november-16-22-2014/
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Weekly News Wrap: Monday, November 17, 2014

by Jessica Dorsey

Your weekly selection of international law and international relations headlines from around the world:

Africa

Middle East and Northern Africa

Asia

  • Thousands of Rohingya boat people who have left Myanmar in the past month have yet to reach their destinations, say relatives and an advocacy group for the persecuted minority, raising fears their boats have been prevented from reaching shore.
  • Three Hong Kong student leaders were stopped from boarding a flight to Beijing on Saturday to take their fight for greater democracy directly to the Chinese government after airline authorities said their travel permits were invalid.
  • North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is to send a personal envoy to Russia, state media said on Friday, the latest in a series of diplomatic moves by the isolated country as it fends off accusations of crimes against humanity.

Europe

Americas

Oceania

  • Australian city Brisbane played host to the G20 meeting, where leaders have pledged to stimulate job growth, bolster global financial institutions and address climate change in the communique released at the end of a two-day summit in Brisbane.

UN/World

  • Fighters from the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) are committing war crimes and crimes against humanity on a large scale in areas under the group’s control in Syria, UN investigators say. In its first report focused squarely on acts by ISIL, the UN Commission of Inquiry on Syria presented on Friday a horrifying picture of what life was like in areas controlled by the group, including massacres, beheadings, torture, sexual enslavement and forced pregnancy.
http://opiniojuris.org/2014/11/17/weekly-news-wrap-monday-november-17-2014/
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Weekend Roundup: November 8-15, 2014

by Jessica Dorsey

This week on Opinio Juris, we had three guest contributions in addition to some of our regular bloggers weighing in on timely issues in international law. The first guest post, from Michael Kearney, discussed his thoughts on the ICC’s recent decision regarding the Mavi Marmara report, in which he focused on issues about fact-finding missions, categorization of armed conflict, limitations on territorial jurisdiction, and humanitarian assistance.

Jean d’Aspremont weighed in on an event that was organized by Manchester International Law Center and the Lincoln Law School, and shared his thoughts about the identification of customary international law and the ILC report. Another post is expected from Jean later this week or beginning of next.

Additionally, Gabor Rona contributed to a discussion about the United States’ AUMF with respect to the Islamic State, that had its origins on Lawfare and Just Security earlier in the week, specifically about use of force provisions against “associated forces” and why the government should go with Just Security’s “parties to the conflict” interpretation versus Lawfare’s proposal of “engaged in hostilities”.

From our regular contributors, we saw Peter’s analysis of Kuwait’s decision to bulk-order Comoros citizenship (to the tune of a couple hundred million dollars) for stateless native-born tribal Bidoon, thereby purporting to solve the statelessness problem in Kuwait and Roger discussed his contribution to a Notre Dame Law Review symposium on Bond v. United States, in which he presented on the relationship between Supreme Court treaty interpretation and the international approach to treaty interpretation under the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties.

Kristin called attention to the election of two new ICJ judges and Kevin also announced a UNWCC event at SOAS London coming up on the 19th.

Finally, I wrapped up the news and An listed events and announcements.

Many thanks to our guest contributors and have a nice weekend!

http://opiniojuris.org/2014/11/15/weekend-roundup-november-8-15-2014/
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Weekly News Wrap: Monday, November 10, 2014

by Jessica Dorsey

Your weekly selection of international law and international relations headlines from around the world:

Africa

  • A suicide bomber dressed as a student killed at least 48 people, most of them students, and injured 79 others at a school assembly in the northeastern Nigerian town of Potiskum on Monday, a hospital official said.
  • Opposition parties, civil society groups and religious leaders adopted a plan on Sunday for a transitional authority to guide Burkina Faso to elections, after a popular uprising forced longtime president Blaise Compaore from power.

Middle East and Northern Africa

Asia

Europe

Americas

Oceania

UN/World

http://opiniojuris.org/2014/11/10/weekly-news-wrap-monday-november-10-2014/
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Weekend Roundup: November 1-7, 2014

by An Hertogen

This week on Opinio Juris, Peter continued his commentary on the Zivotofsky hearing and Kristen posted the transcript of the recent hearing in the Haiti Cholera case.

Jens wrote about the DOD’s plans for a Defense Clandestine Service, and welcomed the news that President Obama will seek congressional authorization for the ISIS campaign.

Kevin discussed the passage in the OTP’s Mavi Marmara decision where the OTP finds that Israel is still occupying Gaza, and explained why the Comoros’ appeal will have little effect in practice.

In guests posts, Nikolaos Ioannidis wrote on the complex legal issues surrounding activities in the Cyprus EEZ, and Giacomo Pailli analysed the Italian Constitutional Court’s decision that the ICJ decision in Germany v Italy can be given no effect in the Italian legal system.

Finally, Jessica wrapped up the news and listed events and announcements, and Kevin asked our European readers for advice on PhD applications.

Many thanks to our guest contributors and have a nice weekend!

http://opiniojuris.org/2014/11/08/weekend-roundup-november-1-7-2014/
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Weekly News Wrap: Monday, November 3, 2014

by Jessica Dorsey

Your weekly selection of international law and international relations headlines from around the world:

Africa

Middle East and Northern Africa

Asia

Europe

Americas

Oceania

UN/World

http://opiniojuris.org/2014/11/03/weekly-news-wrap-monday-november-3-2014/
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Weekend Roundup: October 18-31, 2014

by An Hertogen

This fortnight on Opinio Juris, Jens predicted that the Ebola crisis will become a Chapter VII issue at the UN. The theme of the UN and diseases continued in Kristen’s update on a hearing on the UN’s Privileges and Immunities in the Haiti Cholera case. In other UN news, she summarized some of the issues discussed at a meeting on the Security Council’s methods.

Kevin wrote on the Constitutional Court of South Africa’s decision in the Zimbabwe Torture Docket case, finding that international law did not prohibit universal-jurisdiction investigations in absentia.  Kevin also assessed the likelihood of the ICC’s OTP opening an investigation into Chevron’s activities in Ecuador. For those in need of a refresher on these activities, Peter recommended Paul Barrett’s Law of the Jungle.

Peter looked ahead at the Supreme Court argument in Zivotofsky v. Kerry, and pointed out three factors that in his view point to the Court sustaining the Jerusalem Passport Statute, while Julian wondered what China really means when it celebrates the “International Rule of Law”.

Kevin congratulated Dapo Akande on his promotion to Professor of International Law at Oxford, and recommended a post by Mark Kersten on the terror attacks in Canada.

We ran two guest posts: one by Chimène Keitner on the evolving law of foreign official immunity, and one by William Dodge who raised a question on the Convention on the International Sale of Goods.

Finally, Jessica wrapped up the international law headlines (1, 2), and we listed events and announcements (1, 2). Our readers may also be interested in a Lawfare podcast on al-Bahlul, featuring Kevin, Wells Bennet and Steve Vladeck.

Have a nice weekend!

http://opiniojuris.org/2014/11/01/weekend-roundup-october-18-31-2014/
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Weekly News Wrap: Monday, October 27, 2014

by Jessica Dorsey

Your weekly selection of international law and international relations headlines from around the world:

Africa

Middle East and Northern Africa

Asia

Europe

Americas

Oceania

  • A group of asylum seekers in Australia who took the immigration department to court over the exposure of their personal details in a major data breach have won a federal court appeal, and the immigration minister has been ordered to pay their costs.

UN/World

http://opiniojuris.org/2014/10/27/weekly-news-wrap-monday-october-27-2014/
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Weekly News Wrap: Monday, October 20, 2014

by Jessica Dorsey

Your weekly selection of international law and international relations headlines from around the world:

Africa

Middle East and Northern Africa

Asia

Europe

Americas

Oceania

  • Australian police have agreed to assist China in the extradition and seizure of assets of corrupt Chinese officials who have fled with hundreds of millions of dollars in illicit funds, the Sydney Morning Herald newspaper reported on Monday.

UN/World

http://opiniojuris.org/2014/10/20/weekly-news-wrap-monday-october-20-2014/
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Weekend Roundup: October 4-17, 2014

by An Hertogen

This fortnight on Opinio Juris, Jens discussed how to get Quirin right when Quirin was wrong. Kevin asked for sources backing the US position on self-defence against non-state actors, while Kristen gave an overview of the legal issues up for debate at the General Assembly this fall. Julian expressed doubts about the strength of Greece’s legal arguments for the return of the Elgin Marbles.

We also had a range of guest posts, with Başak Çalı commenting on the Tory attack on the European Human Rights system, and Oliver Windridge discussing how a recent decision by the Director of Public Prosecutions for England and Wales confirms that there is no immunity for torture in England and Wales. Yanying Li followed up on an earlier post discussing the recent reforms for more orderly sovereign debt restructurings at the IMF.

Finally, Jessica and I wrapped up the international law headlines (1, 2) and listed events and announcements (1, 2). Our DC-based readers can hear Kevin speak on Monday at an event at George Mason University on the ICC and Palestine.

Many thanks to our guest contributors and have a nice weekend!

http://opiniojuris.org/2014/10/18/weekend-roundup-october-4-17-2014/
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