Videos of “New Haven School” Conference

Videos of “New Haven School” Conference

As you may remember, last month Peggy, Duncan, and I attended a conference at Yale Law School on the contributions of the New Haven School to international law. In part this was about the policy-oriented jurisprudence associated with Harold Lasswell, Myres McDougal, and Michael Reisman (among others). In part the conference was about the ideas of transnational legal process elucidated by Dean Harold Koh. And, in part, the conference considered whether there are jurisprudential similarities in the work of younger law professors who had been educated at Yale, such a Oona Hathaway (now teaching there), Rosa Brooks, Robert Ahdieh, Ryan Goodman, and Derek Jinks, to name a few who are probably well-known to readers of this blog.

The conference opened with a sort of tour of the horizon by Dean Harold Koh ( a link to his Powerpoint presentation is below.)

I presented a paper on the first panel on updating the idea of “diverse systems of public order” from Lasswell and McDougal . My paper looks at geopolitics in and around Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union and asks whether state practice shows that the U.S, Russia, the EU, and other significant actors have divergent, and at times competing, conceptions of international law to the extent that we should consider them as multiple systems of international law. (I’ll post the paper soon.) This is part of a larger project on which I am working.

Following are links to the videos of the panels. Each panel has an opening from the moderator, then panelists presentations, followed by Q&A, and concluding with closing remarks from the presenters.

THE “NEW” NEW HAVEN SCHOOL:
INTERNATIONAL LAW—PAST, PRESENT & FUTURE

Welcome and Opening Remarks

Harold Hongju Koh, Yale Law School
Page with link to Harold Koh’s Powerpoint presentation

Panel I: Historical Perspectives on the New Haven School

Moderator:

• Michael Reisman, Yale Law School

Presenters:

• Paul Berman, Princeton University,
A Pluralist Approach to International Law

• Christopher Borgen, St. John’s University,
Whose Public, Whose Order?: Imperium, Region, and Normative Friction

Discussants:

• Sarah Cleveland, Harvard University

• Siegfried Wiessner, St. Thomas University

• Andrew Willard, University of Iowa

Panel II: Applications of the New Haven School: Professional Scholarship

Moderator:

• Harold Hongju Koh, Yale Law School

Presenters:

• Rebecca Bratspies, City University of New York,
Crafting a Green Landing for Spaceship Earth: Some Navigational Advice From The New Haven School

• Janet Levit, University of Tulsa,
Bottom-Up Transnational Lawmaking: Reflections on the New Haven School of International Law

• Hari Osofsky, University of Oregon,
A Law and Geography Perspective on the New Haven School

• Melissa Waters, Washington and Lee University,
Normativity in the “New” New Haven School: Assessing the Legitimacy of International Legal Norms Created by the World’s Judges

Panel III: Applications of the New Haven School: Student Scholarship

Moderators:
• Paul Dubinsky, Wayne State University

• Noah Novogrodsky, Georgetown University

• Beth Van Schaack, Santa Clara University

Presenters:

• Michael Gottesman, Yale Law School,
Revising the Golden Rule: Reciprocity and the Geneva Conventions in Modern Conflicts

• Nicole Hallett, Yale Law School,
National Human Rights Institutions: Bringing Human Rights Home

• Ji Li, Yale Law School,
From “See You in Court!” to “See You in Geneva!” An Empirical Study of the Role of Social Norms in International Trade Dispute Resolution

• Dakota Rudesill, Center for Strategic & International Studies,
Precision War and Responsibility

Panel IV: Is there a “New” New Haven School?

Moderators:• Laura Dickinson, Princeton University

• Oona Hathaway, Yale Law School

Discussants:

• Robert Ahdieh, Emory University

• Rosa Brooks, Open Society Institute

• Ryan Goodman, Harvard Law School

• Derek Jinks, University of Texas

Topics
General, Videos
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